Sue Lincoln

Tax Reform: What Are We Thinking?

The upcoming legislative session will address tax reform, so what are we – the people of Louisiana – thinking? “Most people think they’re paying their fair share, so finding the particular tax to raise and finding who is going to pay for it – that’s much more complicated,” says Michael Henderson with the LSU Public Policy Research Lab.

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Trump Takes Aim At A Centerpiece Of Obama's Environmental Legacy

President Trump signed a sweeping executive order Tuesday that takes aim at a number of his predecessor's climate policies. The wide-ranging order seeks to undo the centerpiece of former President Obama's environmental legacy and national efforts to address climate change. It could also jeopardize America's current role in international efforts to confront climate change. In a symbolic gesture, Trump signed the document at the headquarters of Environmental Protection Agency. Standing next to...

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A Trip for Two to Havana, Cuba with the WRKF Travel Club

Proposal to Eliminate Funding for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting

Learn more about the Federal Budget Blueprint released March 16th proposing to end funding for public broadcasting.

In September 2016, the Department of Housing and Urban Development awarded East Baton Rouge Parish an $11 million grant to assist with flood recovery. Thursday night, Mayor Sharon West Broome's office proposed a new plan on how to spend it. Wallis Watkins reports.

One Collector or Many?

Mar 20, 2017
giphy.com

The Sales Tax Streamlining Commission is nearly ready to release their recommendations on which sales tax exclusions and exemptions should stay and which should go away, but they seem to have reached an impasse on another aspect of streamlining.


Sue Lincoln

“We have done the most comprehensive study of Louisiana’s criminal justice system in the history of our state,” Corrections Secretary Jimmy Leblanc said, as the Justice Reinvestment Task Force presented its final report, including 27 recommendations aimed at reducing Louisiana’s “world’s highest” incarceration rate.


Sue Lincoln

State Police Superintendent Colonel Mike Edmonson announced his retirement Wednesday.

“I’m not bigger than State Police and I think that what’s most important is the men and women that make up public safety and the men and women that make up State Police. They need to continue forward. We certainly don’t need any distractions,” he explained.


McNeese State University library

How has business grown so influential in state politics? As the legislature prepares to debate issues like tax reform and equal pay -- which often pit businesses against workers and other individuals -- it’s time for a history lesson.


Sue Lincoln

Though the next full round of statewide elections is more than two years away, how do Governor John Bel Edwards’ chances for re-election look?

“I would say about 50-50,” pollster John Couvillon of JMC Analytics told the Baton Rouge Press Club Monday.

“Even though he has the benefits of incumbency, it’s also becoming very tough to be a Democrat in Louisiana.”

Overall, Couvillon believes Edwards “broke even” with voters during a difficult first year in office.

Creative Commons CC0

Thirty years ago, the United States Supreme Court ruled against Louisiana requiring teaching of both evolution and creationism in public schools. But debate over the role of the two theories in education continues. 


Sue Lincoln

“…You have the right to an attorney. If you cannot afford a lawyer, one will be provided for you at government expense…”

Thanks to movies and TV, we’re all familiar with those words from the Miranda warning.


Sue Lincoln

Louisiana’s business and industry community says it’s supporting the efforts to reform the state’s criminal justice system. 

“If we can get more people into that workforce somehow, devising those ways to move them from where they aren’t being productive to where they can be productive, it too is part of the big issue in terms of the budget,” Mike Olivier with the Committee of 100 says.


courtesy: The Rouge Collection

How did Louisiana end up with the world’s highest incarceration rate? Lafourche Parish Sheriff Craig Webre says it grew out of the late 1980’s national political emphasis on “law and order.”

“The prison population grew exponentially and it became, quite candidly, a cottage industry/prison industrial complex of housing people that were sentenced to jail,” Webre explains.  “And the Louisiana legislature passed laws that the judges enforced.”

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