Sue Lincoln

Fiscal Cliff Not Out of Sight, Nor Out of Mind

Only 344 more days till Louisiana reaches the edge of the fiscal cliff, yet most state legislators are following the “out-of-sight, out-of-mind” prescription. Not so for the administration, though, as the issue loomed large over Thursday’s State Bond Commission meeting.

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Why The Stock Market's Rise Isn't Just A Trump Rally

If you've checked your retirement account lately or read the business headlines you probably know the stock market is riding high. The major U.S. stock indexes are in record territory. So what's lifting the market? Despite all the turmoil in Washington, is it still the Trump rally? Since the U.S. election, the S&P 500 is up 16 percent and the Dow is up 18 percent, even though President Trump has yet to deliver on most of his pro-growth policies, including tax cuts and a big infrastructure...

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npr.org

Cindy has left Louisiana, but not without leaving some flooded roadways behind. DOTD Secretary Shawn Wilson says anyone travelling today would be wise to check 511la.org first.


Sue Lincoln

Heading to the Governor’s Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness (GOHSEP) for the latest on Tropical Storm Cindy, I felt my shoulders tightening up, and caught myself thinking, “Oh no, not again!”

But what about those who are still rebuilding from last year’s floods? Is Louisiana prepared to help with the emotional and psychological stress of this event?


Wallis Watkins

The Louisiana Budget Project, a indepedent nonprofit that studies budget policy in the state, released a report Tuesday detailing how the American Health Care Act could impact Louisiana. 


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When will lawmakers be called back for the next special session to deal with the fiscal cliff?

“You know, that’s a good question,” Governor John Bel Edwards said, when asked. “And I truly don’t know.”


Sue Lincoln

“I move the House of Representatives adjourn sine die,” the “dean” of the House Andy Anders intoned Friday evening, receiving cheers in response.

The second special session of the year delivered a budget only marginally different than the one proposed by the Senate during the regular session. That had many – including Governor John Bel Edwards – wondering aloud whether the special session had truly been necessary.

LSU Ag Center

Even the best of gardeners fall short of finding that perfect tomato fruit. Failure to set fruit can be caused by many different problems.


screenshot from legis.la.gov

“This is essentially the same bill that we passed out a couple of weeks ago, that we thought was responsible and made complete sense,” Senate Finance chair Eric LaFleur told his committee. “It just took a little, a week I think, for the House to come around. And I don’t foresee it getting any better than it is now.”


courtesy: youtube

A somber mood dominated the Capitol Wednesday, following the early morning news that Louisiana Congressman Steve Scalise had been shot.


Sue Lincoln

The House Appropriations Committee passed the newest version of the state’s operating budget Tuesday. Chairman Cameron Henry (R-Metairie) says this latest version leaves $100 million unspent. 


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“The more we fund this year, the bigger the fiscal cliff is going to be next year. And we can’t sustain more taxes. It’s irresponsible!”

Representative Valarie Hodges (R-Denham Springs) summed up the thinking of a majority of House Appropriations committee members, as special session budget hearings began where the regular session left off – with a bill that doesn’t spend all the estimated revenue.


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