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Where The Jobs Are -- And Who Is Filling Them

Whether it’s refundable tax credits, a decade's worth of property tax forgiveness, or cash up front, Louisiana is making deals with industry. In fact, state Economic Development Secretary Don Pierson has a new video out about it.

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White House Suspects Syria Is Preparing For Another Chemical Attack

The White House announced Monday night that it sees signs that the Syrian government is preparing to launch another chemical weapons attack in its war against insurgents. The White House press office released this statement: "The United States has identified potential preparations for another chemical weapons attack by the Assad regime that would likely result in the mass murder of civilians, including innocent children. The activities are similar to preparations the regime made before its...

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New York Times Executive Editor Dean Baquet to speak at WRKF Founders Luncheon

Friday September 22 at 12 p.m. at the Crowne Plaza, Baton Rouge

1A Mornings and Evenings

Catch an extra hour at 7 p.m.

media commons

“What we constantly are hearing is ‘Our hands are tied because we have dedicated funds in the constitution’,” Baton Rouge Representative Franklin Foil reminded the House Appropriations Committee Monday.

But the question of whether to dedicate or undedicate state funds may ultimately be left to voters, as state lawmakers are moving forward with constitutional amendments proposing to tie up more money, as well as one to unlock funds that are currently off limits.


Nothing Personal

May 15, 2017
Sue Lincoln

The friction between House Republican leadership and Democratic Governor John Bel Edwards is no secret. But is it just partisan politics, or is it personal? I sat down with House Appropriations Chairman Cameron Henry to try and find out.

“The governor and I get along just fine,” Henry insisted. “We went deer hunting once, duck hunting twice last season. No, personally, he and I get along just fine.”

Henry admits he has some philosophical differences with the governor when it comes to budgeting.

LSU AgCenter

It's not quite summer yet, but the days are becoming longer and hotter. Heat can be unpleasant for people and for plants. That's sepcially the case when they don't have enough to drink.

The hotter it gets, the faster the water either evaporates from the soil or is consumed and then lost by the plant. Landscapers should make sure gardens receive about one inch of water per week. That means there needs to be at least an inch of rain, an inch of irrigated water, or a combination every week.


Media Resource Center

The full House put a number of bills through the mill Thursday, having some bi-partisan fun along the way.

“This is my rescue-a-Republican-bill day,” New Iberia Democrat Terry Landry joked, as he helped Denham Springs Republican Valerie Hodges pass her ignition interlock bill.


Ming Wang

“We’re struggling to find ways to pay for health care and balance it against the other needs of the state. The fiscal note says this could generate as much as 100-million in a given year.”

Ascension Parish Representative Tony Bacala said, as he presented his bill requiring the Louisiana Department of Health to move to managed care programs for those with long-term health needs on Wednesday.


Louisiana Senate Broadcast

Senator J.P. Morrell's bill to trim a portion of the Industrial Tax Exemption Program didn't fare well on the Senate Floor Tuesday. 


Sue Lincoln

We’re halfway through the legislative session now, and the House Ways and Means committee finally began moving some tax reform bills Monday. As anticipated, the preferred plan is a package of bills authored by Representative Barry Ivey (R-Baton Rouge).


Wallis Watkins

Last week, a plan to try and fund the Comite River Diversion project out of the 2016 flood recovery money created a debate on the House floor. The plan was brought by Denham Springs Representative Valerie Hodges. 


These are green beans.
LSU AgCenter

Homeowners and renters alike are becoming more interested in growing their own vegetables these days. There are a number of good reasons to look into it.

Some want to grow their own produce to provide a freher, healthier product than they can get from the store. Others feel it's important to exercise self-sufficiency in the production of food. Others go into vegetable gardening for the economics of it and find it most cost effective to grow food rather than than buying from a grocery store.


Don't Call Them 'Cuts'

May 5, 2017
legis,la,gov

When the full House convened Thursday to debate and vote on the budget bill, Appropriations chairman Cameron Henry put members on notice: choose your words carefully.

“We don’t have any 'cuts' in the budget. We’re reducing the appropriation because we don’t have the money. For me to 'cut' you, I have to have given you the money in the first place, and we haven’t given anyone any money as of right now.”

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