Culture

The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
7:07 am
Wed July 2, 2014

A Woman Wrestles With A Disturbing Family Memento

Carol Zachary's grandfather, Herbert Fleming, a county auditor, was required to attend Montana's first legal triple-hanging in a barn in Meagher County, Mont., in 1917. Fleming was one of approximately 60 witnesses that day.
Courtesy of Carol Zachary

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 1:15 pm

NPR continues a series of conversations about The Race Card Project, where thousands of people have submitted their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words. Every so often NPR Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris dips into those stories to explore issues surrounding race and cultural identity for Morning Edition.

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Culture
4:54 pm
Mon June 30, 2014

Why 140 Characters, When One Will Do? Tracing The Emoji Evolution

NPR

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 6:01 pm

You may have heard that 250 more emojis, the little smiley face icons and other symbols you can send in text messages, are coming to a cellphone near you.

The story of the emoji starts in Japan in the mid-1990s. Back then, pagers were all the rage with teenagers.

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Men In America
5:02 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

The New American Man Doesn't Look Like His Father

While life has changed significantly for American men in the past half-century, notions of masculinity remain tied to those that may have been passed down from this father to the son on his shoulders.
Evans/Three Lions Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 10:36 am

This summer, All Things Considered is exploring what it means to be a man in America today. In some ways, the picture for men has changed dramatically over the past 50 years. More women than men are going to college, and the economy is moving away from jobs that traditionally favored men, like manufacturing and mining. Attitudes have also changed on the social front, with young men having more egalitarian attitudes toward women and expectations of being involved fathers.

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Culture
10:13 am
Sat June 21, 2014

The Runner-Up Religions Of America

Courtesy of the ASARB

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 7:30 am

Glance at the map above, Second Largest Religious Tradition in Each State 2010, and you will see that Buddhism (orange), Judaism (pink) and Islam (blue) are the runner-up religions across the country.

No surprises there. But can you believe that Hindu (dark orange) is the No. 2 tradition in Arizona and Delaware, and that Baha'i (green) ranks second in South Carolina?

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Culture
3:40 pm
Fri June 20, 2014

Award Winning Vocalist Brings Bluegrass to Baton Rouge

Claire Lynch

Tonight at 8 PM, the Unitarian Church will be filled with the rolling rhythms of award winning bluegrass.  Though The Claire Lynch Band might not be a mainstream name, the band and its members are well-known and respected in the bluegrass community.  Claire Lynch, who heads the band, spoke with Elizabeth Eads earlier this week while on the road heading to Baton Rouge.
 

Playlist:

The Claire Lynch Band-Once the Teardrops Start to Fall 

The Claire Lynch Band-I'll Be Alright Tomorrow

The Claire Lynch Band-Doin' Time

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Civil Rights Movement
1:59 am
Thu June 19, 2014

Still Learning From The 'Pearl Harbor' Of The Civil Rights Movement

Civil rights activists gather outside Mount Zion Church in Philadelphia, Miss., on Sunday to honor the murdered civil rights workers. From left: Bob Moses, Dave Dennis, Rita Schwerner Bender, Leroy Clemons, Myrlie Evers-Williams and Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga.
Rogelio V. Solis AP

Originally published on Thu June 19, 2014 8:37 am

This weekend marks 50 years since three young civil rights workers went missing in Philadelphia, Miss., drawing the nation's attention to the brutal resistance to equal rights in the South at the time.

Justice came slowly, but the murders did help spur change. Today, young people are still learning about the activists' legacy, hoping to inspire further action.

Attack At The Church

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Culture
9:23 am
Wed June 18, 2014

A Rhythm That Has Waltzed Away With Hearts

Debutantes in the opening waltz of the 2011 Vienna Opera Ball. The head of the Vienna Institute for Strauss Research calls the waltz "Austria's premier cultural export."
JOE KLAMAR AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 2:11 pm

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Culture
3:32 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

Mississippi Marks 50 Years Since History-Changing 'Freedom Summer'

A new exhibit at the Mississippi state archives includes photographs, excerpts from journals and film clips documenting 1964's Freedom Summer.
Debbie Elliott NPR

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 5:50 pm

A new exhibit at the Mississippi state archives takes you back in time. The facade of a front porch, complete with screen door, invites you to imagine what it was like for some 900 activists, mostly white college students, who in 1964 came to the nation's most closed society.

Robert Moses was an organizer of what was at the time formally known as the Mississippi Summer Project.

"That's sort of what was nice about it. There was no pretension that we were going to change history," Moses says. "We were just going to have our little summer project."

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Culture
7:41 am
Thu June 5, 2014

Chart-Topping 'Chapel Of Love' Turns 50

The Dixie Cups in New York City in 1964, the year the group's song "Chapel of Love" hit No. 1 on the charts.
Michael Ochs Archives Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 5:49 pm

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Culture
11:27 am
Sun June 1, 2014

On The Trail Of Black Cowboys From Nat Love To Sheriff Bart

Nat Love, African American cowboy who claimed to have won the name of Deadwood Dick in South Dakota, 1876, by virtue of his roping talent. Full length photo with lariat and saddle. From his privately published autobiography (1907).
Bettmann Corbis

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 4:20 pm

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