Culture

Music, art, literature, food, language, and all that makes us Louisianians.

Frank Barnett, WRKF

Driving down Capitol Heights in Mid-City a few weeks back, I saw a sign in front of a house. It was...a colorful sign, to say the least, and what it said intrigued me: "Live Music - Friday - 6:30 to 8:30." I decided to check it out, and what I found was not what I expected.

“It’s a neighborhood event,"  said David Henson, leader of the Adult Music Club of Baton Rouge. "It’s not really like a music venue, like a club show or anything like that where there’s going to be a crowd of rowdy people, or anything like that; but I do like (it) – this is a pretty good little house.”


Baton Rouge Gallery

For the Baton Rouge Gallery's August show, three artists that work in radically different mediums seem to converge on the same theme: structure. Jason Andreasen, Executive Director of the Gallery, tells us more about Amy James, Brian Kelly and Linda Jeffers.

Harper Collins

There has never been much in public view related to the work of novelist Harper Lee. There were certainly no manuscripts of To Kill a Mockingbird, let alone the newly discovered and now published companion Go Set a Watchman.

While working in special collections at Lee's alma mater, the University of Alabama, Jessica Lacher-Feldman, who is now at LSU, put together exhibitions mostly with writings from the novelist's days as a student and copies of her famous first published book from all over the world.


Confederate flag for the Second Louisiana Cavalry.
Public Domain

The confederate battle flag is coming down from the South Carolina statehouse. And New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu has asked the city council to consider removing four monuments commemorating confederate leaders and battles from public spaces in that city.

Controversy bubbled up across the country after a mass shooting at a black church in Charleston last month. The suspected shooter had posted pictures of himself holding a confederate flag.

But, Maxine Crump, director of Dialogue on Race Louisiana, says most of the people around her aren't talking about it.

On June 26, WRKF lost one of its founders, Lew Carter. He was also a radio personality, with a capital “P”. 


Ten days before he died, Lew, at age 92, drove himself in his red car the few blocks from his house to the station to talk about his radio legacy. 
He came prepared with a 6-page-long narrative he’d emailed in advance.


Is Common Core College Prep?

Jun 22, 2015

The Common Core education standards have generated a lot of debate, and controversy.  

But that political noise can sometimes cloud the goal of the standards: to better prepare students for careers, and college.  

To wrap up the Southern Education Desk series on Common Core, from New Orleans, Nina Feldman examines whether the standards are meeting that goal.


It seemed as if he'd go on forever — and B.B. King was working right up until the end. It's what he loved to do: playing music, and fishing. Even late in life, living with diabetes, he spent about half the year on the road. King died Thursday night at home in Las Vegas. He was 89 years old.

Has American English become homogenized? Have our regional ways of saying particular things — sometimes in very particular ways — receded into the past? Or do we talk as funny as ever?

Business is brisk at the Ole Curiosities and Book Shoppe, a block off the town square in Monroeville, Ala.

Jennifer Brinkley and her friend Leigh Mikovch are at the counter, putting in a pre-order for Go Set a Watchman, the much anticipated forthcoming book from Harper Lee.

"We're big Harper Lee fans and To Kill a Mockingbird fans," Brinkley says.

Both are writers from Bowling Green, Ky. They're visiting Monroeville for the annual Alabama Writers Symposium. Brinkley says it will be meaningful to have the new book come from Lee's hometown.

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