Culture

Culture
3:40 pm
Fri June 20, 2014

Award Winning Vocalist Brings Bluegrass to Baton Rouge

Claire Lynch

Tonight at 8 PM, the Unitarian Church will be filled with the rolling rhythms of award winning bluegrass.  Though The Claire Lynch Band might not be a mainstream name, the band and its members are well-known and respected in the bluegrass community.  Claire Lynch, who heads the band, spoke with Elizabeth Eads earlier this week while on the road heading to Baton Rouge.
 

Playlist:

The Claire Lynch Band-Once the Teardrops Start to Fall 

The Claire Lynch Band-I'll Be Alright Tomorrow

The Claire Lynch Band-Doin' Time

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Civil Rights Movement
1:59 am
Thu June 19, 2014

Still Learning From The 'Pearl Harbor' Of The Civil Rights Movement

Civil rights activists gather outside Mount Zion Church in Philadelphia, Miss., on Sunday to honor the murdered civil rights workers. From left: Bob Moses, Dave Dennis, Rita Schwerner Bender, Leroy Clemons, Myrlie Evers-Williams and Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga.
Rogelio V. Solis AP

Originally published on Thu June 19, 2014 8:37 am

This weekend marks 50 years since three young civil rights workers went missing in Philadelphia, Miss., drawing the nation's attention to the brutal resistance to equal rights in the South at the time.

Justice came slowly, but the murders did help spur change. Today, young people are still learning about the activists' legacy, hoping to inspire further action.

Attack At The Church

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Culture
9:23 am
Wed June 18, 2014

A Rhythm That Has Waltzed Away With Hearts

Debutantes in the opening waltz of the 2011 Vienna Opera Ball. The head of the Vienna Institute for Strauss Research calls the waltz "Austria's premier cultural export."
JOE KLAMAR AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 2:11 pm

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Culture
3:32 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

Mississippi Marks 50 Years Since History-Changing 'Freedom Summer'

A new exhibit at the Mississippi state archives includes photographs, excerpts from journals and film clips documenting 1964's Freedom Summer.
Debbie Elliott NPR

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 5:50 pm

A new exhibit at the Mississippi state archives takes you back in time. The facade of a front porch, complete with screen door, invites you to imagine what it was like for some 900 activists, mostly white college students, who in 1964 came to the nation's most closed society.

Robert Moses was an organizer of what was at the time formally known as the Mississippi Summer Project.

"That's sort of what was nice about it. There was no pretension that we were going to change history," Moses says. "We were just going to have our little summer project."

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Culture
7:41 am
Thu June 5, 2014

Chart-Topping 'Chapel Of Love' Turns 50

The Dixie Cups in New York City in 1964, the year the group's song "Chapel of Love" hit No. 1 on the charts.
Michael Ochs Archives Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 5:49 pm

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Culture
11:27 am
Sun June 1, 2014

On The Trail Of Black Cowboys From Nat Love To Sheriff Bart

Nat Love, African American cowboy who claimed to have won the name of Deadwood Dick in South Dakota, 1876, by virtue of his roping talent. Full length photo with lariat and saddle. From his privately published autobiography (1907).
Bettmann Corbis

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 4:20 pm

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Culture
3:47 pm
Fri May 30, 2014

Ralph Ellison: No Longer The 'Invisible Man' 100 Years After His Birth

Ralph Ellison in 1957, four years after his novel Invisible Man won the National Book Award. Ellison died in 1994.
James Whitmore The Life Picture Collection/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 6:07 pm

A monument outside 730 Riverside Drive in Harlem, N.Y. — writer Ralph Ellison's longtime home — commemorates his life and his work. The marker, and many biographical sources, list his birth date as being 1914. But in fact, he was born a year earlier.

Still, events in Oklahoma City — his birthplace — and New York City, where he spent most of his life, are celebrating the centennial of his birth this year.

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Culture
6:30 am
Thu May 29, 2014

Meet the Neighbors: Franklin Brown's Bayou Café is 'a Weather Forecaster'

Franklin Brown, owner, Bayou Café
Credit Ann Marie Awad / WRKF news

Meet The Neighbors introduces you to some of the remarkable people who live and work in the Baton Rouge area. Do you know someone we should meet? E-mail us at news@wrkf.org and keep up with Meet The Neighbors, follow us on Tumblr.

Franklin Brown has owned Bayou Café at 5688 Airline Highway in Scotlandville since 2000.

Brown says his first love is Southern University, where he graduated in 1975. He says the entire North Baton Rouge community comes in close second. In his last 14 years of business, Bayou Café has become something of a meeting place. In the mornings, the place is slammed.

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Culture
3:44 pm
Tue May 27, 2014

Album Review: 'Runaway's Diary'

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 8:53 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Memphis singer songwriter Amy LaVere specializes in lyrics that are more barbed than her sweet soprano prepares you for. Our music critic, Robert Christgau, thinks she's never gotten that balance quite as right as she has on her new album, "Runaway's Diary."

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Culture
4:06 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

Heir To A Jazz Legacy, A Trumpeter Finds His Own Way

Theo Croker's new album, AfroPhysicist, comes out May 20.
Thomas Brodin Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 9:20 am

Jazz composer and trumpeter Theo Croker opens his new album, AfroPhysicist, with an ode to his grandfather: New Orleans jazz great Doc Cheatham. The thing is, Croker didn't grow up in New Orleans or any other jazz hub. He's from Jacksonville, Fla., and he was just a child when his grandfather died in 1997. It wasn't until his grandfather's memorial services — attended by jazz legends — that he decided to join the legacy.

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