Culture

Culture
6:46 am
Fri August 23, 2013

Southern Students Head to 50th Anniversary March on Washington Celebrations

Simone Bray, 21, is a Senior and President of the Student Government Association at Southern University in Baton Rouge. She is traveling with over 50 other Southern students to Washington DC to partake in March on Washington 50th Anniversary celebrations.
Credit WRKF

Next Wednesday marks the 50th anniversary of the March on the Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

In 1963 hundreds of thousands rallied in the National Mall in DC for civil and economic rights for African Americans.  That rally is also where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. made his historic speech in front of the Lincoln Memorial.

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Culture
3:29 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

'Treme' Cookbook Captures The Flavor Of A Show And A City

Microwave pralines are easier to make than stovetop pralines, and just as tasty.
Ed Anderson Chronicle Books

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 10:34 am

If you find yourself craving New Orleans food, you could go there and melt in the sweltering heat for a dose of gumbo or praline bacon. Or you could settle in on your couch, as I've been doing, and torture yourself watching reruns of the HBO series Treme. It's set in post-Katrina New Orleans and, along with the music, it puts the city's food on center stage.

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Culture
5:02 am
Sat August 17, 2013

To Care For U.S. Kids, Filipinas Leave Their Own Behind

Lita and her son, Myke, now live in Houston together. She still works as a nanny and Myke is an interior designer. Lita's two daughters have also immigrated to the United States.
Ashley Westerman For NPR

Originally published on Sun October 6, 2013 3:53 pm

Few American mothers could fathom a situation that would force them to leave their country in order to put food in their children's bellies, clothes on their backs and send them to school. This is the reality for many Filipina women, who cross oceans in search of jobs that pay enough to provide for their families back home.

The Philippines is known worldwide for sending its citizens overseas to work, and a recent study has shown the country consistently deploys more women than men. In the United States, Filipinas are often nurses and caretakers; many work as nannies

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Culture
1:23 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

African-American Musicians, More Than Just Jazz

Johnny Linton, a music student, performs at the Gateways Music Festival's Youth Showcase Concert
Jim Hunter Gateways Music Festival

Jazz or blues may be the first thing that comes to mind we think of the contributions that African Americans have made to American music genres, but that overlooks the rich heritage of African- Americans in classical music. For two decades the Gateways Music Festival has challenged that image. This year the festival celebrates its 20th Anniversary in Rochester, New York and continues to celebrate the contributions of African-Americans to classical music by featuring world class musicians and conductors of African heritage.

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Culture
8:23 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Responding to Disasters Gives Couple Perspective in Retirement

Clay and Kathy Smilie stand in front of the Emergency Response Vehicle.
WRKF

When most people retire they take up golf, join a local book club, or simply sleep in more. But Clay and Kathy Smilie spend their time in disaster zones as Red Cross Volunteers.


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Music Reviews
3:08 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Buddy Guy: 'Rhythm And Blues' Titan Channels Guitar Wisdom

Buddy Guy's new two-disc set is titled Rhythm & Blues.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 6:25 pm

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Culture
9:42 am
Mon July 29, 2013

Pope Francis Discusses Gay Catholics: 'Who Am I To Judge?'

Pope Francis returned to Rome on Monday after his trip to Brazil. The flight included a news conference in which the pope struck a conciliatory tone about gay Catholics. He also explained what he keeps in his black bag.
Andreas Solaro AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 10:26 am

Gay people should be integrated into society instead of ostracized, Pope Francis told journalists after his weeklong trip to Brazil. Answering a question about reports of homosexuals in the clergy, the pope answered, "If someone is gay and he searches for the Lord and has good will, who am I to judge?"

In what's being called an unusually broad and candid news conference, Francis took questions from reporters for more than an hour as he flew from Brazil to the Vatican; his plane landed Monday.

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Culture
4:46 am
Sat July 27, 2013

Pie-Deprived New Orleans Roots For Bakery, A Year After Fire

Jill Pasquarella (right) pours powdered sugar on Brandon Connelly, who dressed as a baker from Hubig's Pies, during Mardi Gras in New Orleans in February.
Chris Granger The Times-Picayune/Landov

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 11:59 am

Almost any kind of comeback gets New Orleans excited, since the city lost so much in the flood after Hurricane Katrina. That goes especially for food.

One year ago Saturday, New Orleans lost a beloved brand when Hubig's pie bakery burned to the ground. The hand-held, fruit-filled crescents, fried golden-brown, had been delivered fresh to more than 1,000 local stores each morning.

Pie fans have come out in droves to support the company. But it takes more than T-shirts and fond memories to restart a business from scratch.

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Music Interviews
3:41 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

Guy Clark, Music's Master Craftsman, On Making Songs Last

Tools line the walls of Guy Clark's basement workshop at his home in Nashville, where he still builds guitars.
Jinae West NPR

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 5:16 pm

If you want to learn how to write a song — one that's built to last, with vivid characters and images that plant you squarely inside a scene — listen to Guy Clark.

Songwriters who revere Clark will tell you he crafts songs with the same precision and attention to detail he uses when he builds guitars. But Clark has a simpler, blunter explanation, as he told me with a glint in his eye when I visited him recently at his home in Nashville, Tenn.

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Code Switch
1:48 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Mary Hamilton, The Woman Who Put The 'Miss' In Court

Mary Hamilton was found in contempt of court in Alabama, when she refused to answer questions after the prosecution addressed her only by her first name. The U.S. Supreme Court later ruled in her favor.
AP

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 9:58 am

When the U.S. Supreme Court issues a ruling, its decisions can carry weight for generations. Think about decisions in the civil rights era regarding school segregation and the Montgomery bus boycott in Alabama.

As part of our look back on the summer of 1963, we examine another Alabama case that had a subtle effect on the way courts treat defendants.

At a mock trial at Samford University in Birmingham, a student playing the role of a defense attorney questions his client on the stand: "To your knowledge, can a driver turning left turn on a yellow light?"

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