Culture

Music, art, literature, food, language, and all that makes us Louisianians.

Baton Rouge Symphony Orchestra

This Friday the Baton Rouge Symphony Orchestra will take on Louisiana’s gospel music history for the very first time.

A majority of Americans from all walks of life believe in life after death. Yet conversations about the afterlife — from what it might look and feel like to who else one may find there — often remain highly personal ones, shared with family members, clergy or others who share one's faith.

To better understand how many Americans conceive of the afterlife, All Things Considered has spoken with leaders from different faith traditions on their views on life after death.

Your ability to "read" the thoughts and feelings of others could be affected by the kind of fiction you read.

That's the conclusion of a study in the journal Science that gave tests of social perception to people who were randomly assigned to read excerpts from literary fiction, popular fiction or nonfiction.

Pope Francis is meeting on Tuesday with his closest advisors, a hand-picked lot of like-minded cardinals, to discuss the direction of the Roman Catholic Church.

Tracing The Story Of 'Lynch Mob'

Sep 30, 2013

Robert Benmosche, the CEO of insurance giant AIG, was widely criticized last week after comparing reactions to the bonuses his company's employees received in 2009 to a lynch mob.

James Carville is a Democratic political consultant, a TV pundit, and one half of the most famous mixed marriage in the country — his wife is Republican consultant Mary Matalin.

We've invited him to play a game called "You're like two peas in a pod!" Three questions about freakishly similar couples.

Showtime's critically acclaimed series Homeland starts its third season next week; the spies and terrorists who weave its tangled storyline will be back roaming the halls of CIA headquarters and the streets of D.C.

Or so you'll think. But Homeland is actually filmed in Charlotte, N.C. And it's all because of money.

About 40 states offer some sort of incentive to lure Hollywood productions to their precincts. But some have begun to wonder if they're getting their money's worth.

Carl Kasell
NPR

Carl Kasell spent 30 years delivering newscasts every hour in the morning for NPR. But it's his role as the official judge and scorekeeper on the quiz show Wait, Wait… Don't Tell Me! that made him a public radio icon.

In The Wall Street Journal, Wait, Wait Host Peter Sagal called Kasell the world's greatest straight man.

But now that he's retired from newscasting, how does he keep up with the news?

The idea of being a submissive wife, in the Biblical sense of that term, may sound old-fashioned.

But Sara Horn, a devout Baptist, wanted to find out if submitting to her husband could work in their modern marriage.

Horn, a military wife and mom from Zachary and the author of several books, has a new book out about her experience, "My-So Called Life as Submissive Wife."

The experiment was not a no-brainer for her husband, Cliff.

 


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