Culture

Culture
6:30 am
Thu May 29, 2014

Meet the Neighbors: Franklin Brown's Bayou Café is 'a Weather Forecaster'

Franklin Brown, owner, Bayou Café
Credit Ann Marie Awad / WRKF news

Meet The Neighbors introduces you to some of the remarkable people who live and work in the Baton Rouge area. Do you know someone we should meet? E-mail us at news@wrkf.org and keep up with Meet The Neighbors, follow us on Tumblr.

Franklin Brown has owned Bayou Café at 5688 Airline Highway in Scotlandville since 2000.

Brown says his first love is Southern University, where he graduated in 1975. He says the entire North Baton Rouge community comes in close second. In his last 14 years of business, Bayou Café has become something of a meeting place. In the mornings, the place is slammed.

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Culture
3:44 pm
Tue May 27, 2014

Album Review: 'Runaway's Diary'

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 8:53 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Memphis singer songwriter Amy LaVere specializes in lyrics that are more barbed than her sweet soprano prepares you for. Our music critic, Robert Christgau, thinks she's never gotten that balance quite as right as she has on her new album, "Runaway's Diary."

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Culture
4:06 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

Heir To A Jazz Legacy, A Trumpeter Finds His Own Way

Theo Croker's new album, AfroPhysicist, comes out May 20.
Thomas Brodin Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 9:20 am

Jazz composer and trumpeter Theo Croker opens his new album, AfroPhysicist, with an ode to his grandfather: New Orleans jazz great Doc Cheatham. The thing is, Croker didn't grow up in New Orleans or any other jazz hub. He's from Jacksonville, Fla., and he was just a child when his grandfather died in 1997. It wasn't until his grandfather's memorial services — attended by jazz legends — that he decided to join the legacy.

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Culture
6:35 am
Tue May 20, 2014

The Crawfish Festival: Sights, Sounds and History

Claws up!
Ann Marie Awad WRKF News

Festival season is winding down but crawfish season is still going strong. A few weeks ago, I decided to take a trip to Breaux Bridge for the world famous Breaux Bridge crawfish festival. And who better to show a Yankee girl around than Sam Irwin, a freelance writer who just put out a book all about crawfish. It’s called Louisiana Crawfish: A Succulent History of the Cajun Crustacean.


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Culture
9:00 am
Mon May 19, 2014

How Do You Wring Sound From Sculpture? It Takes A 'Quiet Pride'

Rufus Reid has played with just about everybody in the mainstream jazz world. His latest project, Quiet Pride, is based on works by the late sculptor and civil rights activist Elizabeth Catlett.
Jimmy Katz Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun May 18, 2014 10:24 am

Bassist and composer Rufus Reid has been playing jazz for half a century. He's worked with just about everyone, from saxophonists Dexter Gordon and Stan Getz to singer Nancy Wilson and trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie.

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Race Card Project
2:21 am
Mon May 19, 2014

Six Words: 'You've Got To Be Taught' Intolerance

Actors John Kerr and France Nuyen in a scene from the 1958 film South Pacific. The interracial romance between the onstage pair unsettled some audiences.
20th Century Fox Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 6:46 am

NPR continues a series of conversations about The Race Card Project, where thousands of people have submitted their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words. Every so often, NPR Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris will dip into those six-word stories to explore issues surrounding race and cultural identity for Morning Edition.

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Culture
4:07 pm
Sat May 17, 2014

Southern Baptist Leaders Seek Softer Approach To Homosexuality

Pastor Jimmy Scroggins (right) tells other Southern Baptist leaders to be compassionate to gay people during a leadership summit in April.
ERLC Leadership Summit/Flickr

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 5:29 pm

Some Christian denominations around the U.S. have been slowly warming to the idea of gay marriage. A few have even made an about-face.

Not so with the country's largest protestant group, Southern Baptists. The Southern Baptist Convention still preaches that marriage can only be between one man and one woman. But some pastors are softening their message.

A Change Of Tone

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Culture
9:49 am
Sat May 17, 2014

'I've Enjoyed Every Minute Of It': Carl Kasell On His 60 Years In Radio

NPR's Carl Kasell delivers one of his last newscasts during Morning Edition on Dec. 30, 2009, in Washington, D.C.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 1:06 pm

Carl Kasell — the official judge and scorekeeper of the NPR quiz show Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me! — is stepping down after more than 60 years in radio. While you'll still hear him from time to time as he eases into the role as scorekeeper emeritus, his final broadcast airs on Saturday and Sunday.

Kasell recently had a cameo on The Simpsons, and since that's the pinnacle of any career, this seemed like a good moment to look back on his many decades in broadcast.

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Culture
9:46 am
Sat May 17, 2014

Artist Kara Walker Draws Us Into Bitter History With Something Sweet

Viewers of Kara Walker's A Subtlety described the sculpture as "beautiful" and "the American sphinx." Another said, "She is so exposed and she's so vulnerable, but at the same time she has some grace and majesticness that is completely unapproachable."
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 7:00 pm

Kara Walker was barely out of art school when she won a MacArthur Foundation "genius" grant, in 1997. Back then, her early work shocked audiences in part because her murals looked so charming from a distance. Black paper shadow portraits of colonial figures seemed to dance on white gallery walls; but lean in and you'd find your nose pressed up against images of slavery's horrors — mammies, masters, lynchings and sexual violence.

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Culture
5:03 pm
Mon May 12, 2014

Tale Of Two Billboards: An Ozark Town's Struggle To Unseat Hate

Several white supremacist groups have roots near Harrison, Ark. Residents believe a yellow billboard in town is a reaction to a local effort to make the town more inclusive.
Frank Morris KCUR

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 6:58 pm

Second in a two-part report.

The Ozark region, covering most of southern Missouri and northern Arkansas, has long been a haven for white supremacists. The area is home to the neo-Nazi accused of killing three people at Jewish centers near Kansas City, Kan., in April.

The region continues to grapple with a culture that has historically turned a blind eye to bigotry. That fight is particularly concentrated in Harrison, Ark.

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