Culture

Culture
3:21 am
Mon May 12, 2014

For Two Ozarks Communities, A Stark Contrast In Culture

Jason Click is a friend and neighbor of Glenn Miller, who is suspected in three murders last month near Kansas City.
Frank Morris KCUR

Originally published on Tue May 13, 2014 2:01 pm

First of a two-part report.

The neo-Nazi charged with killing three people at Jewish centers outside Kansas City last month drove there from his home in the Ozarks, a hilly, rural, largely conservative part of southern Missouri and northern Arkansas with a history of attracting white supremacists.

The Kansas murders sparked a painful discussion in the shooter's community in Marionville, Mo., where bigotry is an especially divisive subject.

Read more
Culture
1:40 pm
Fri May 9, 2014

What Are The Most (And Least) Charitable U.S. States?

A map of the U.S. shows the states where residents were the most and least likely to say they had recently donated to charity.
Gallup

Originally published on Fri May 9, 2014 5:55 pm

There are only two U.S. states where at least 50 percent of residents say they've recently given either money or time to charity: Utah and Minnesota, according to a new Gallup poll. Nevada and Kentucky tied for the lowest rate of charitable giving.

The poll was conducted in the last six months of 2013, when at least 600 residents of each state were asked whether they had donated money to a charity or volunteered at an organization within the past month.

Read more
Culture
6:30 am
Wed May 7, 2014

Meet The Neighbors

Credit Ann Marie Awad

Everyone can think of a character they know. Someone who puts their mark on the community. Someone who just has a colorful personality. Someone you just want to know more about.

Meet The Neighbors introduces you to some of the remarkable people who live and work in the Baton Rouge area. 

Read more
Culture
6:30 am
Wed May 7, 2014

Meet The Neighbors: Tess Brunet Offers 'a Music Education'

Tess Brunet with Agnes the cockatiel
Credit Ann Marie Awad

Meet The Neighbors introduces you to some of the remarkable people who live and work in the Baton Rouge area. Do you know someone we should meet? E-mail us at news@wrkf.org and keep up with Meet The Neighbors, follow us on Tumblr.

In a cozy little duplex in Beauregard Town, Tess Brunet runs a neighborhood record store. 

The Houma native opened the store with her partner Patrick -- he’s from Maine. And he’s the one who came up with the name, Lagniappe Records.

“He was so enamored by South Louisiana and New Orleans and he’s discovering all these things about this region and you know Lagniappe is you know it’s normal to me I know what that is, people anywhere else besides here they see that word and they’re like ‘how do you say that?" she jokes. "He fell in love with this area.”

After touring the country as a musician, Brunet landed in New Orleans, but she kept being drawn back to Baton Rouge.  

Read more
Culture
6:20 am
Tue April 29, 2014

Poet Laureate Spreads the Word About Louisiana Poetry

Ava Leavell Haymon

 In honor of National Poetry Month, Ann Marie Awad sat down to talk with Ava Leavell Haymon, Louisiana’s Poet Laureate. She’s on a mission to change the way the rest of the world looks at the state of Louisiana through poetry. 

Read more
Culture
1:57 pm
Sat April 26, 2014

At The NRA Meeting: Come For The Guns, Stay For The Camaraderie

Ben Pickering shows off a new Ambush AR-15 rifle after winning a drawing at the NRA annual meeting in Indianapolis on Friday.
Courtesy David Potter

Originally published on Sat April 26, 2014 2:14 pm

Ben Pickering can't believe his luck.

"Holy cow," he keeps saying. "Man, that's just incredible. That's just amazing."

Pickering won a drawing for an Ambush rifle, an $1,800 AR-15-style model. Pickering already has a lot of weapons — "I honestly could not count," he says — but he's still excited to be given this new one.

Pickering loves guns, but he's also happy that the National Rifle Association's annual meeting, being held this weekend in Indianapolis, has given him the chance to meet up with family members who live in other states.

Read more
Culture
5:38 pm
Thu April 24, 2014

Growing Up, Cokie Roberts Didn't Learn Much About the Founding Mothers Either

Roughly a decade ago, NPR news analyst Cokie Roberts authored a best-selling book about the women who were behind, and in some cases alongside, the Founding Fathers.

There’s a new illustrated version, for kids, called, Founding Mothers: Remembering the Ladies.


Read more
Culture
10:28 am
Fri April 18, 2014

How Do We Explain The Evolution Of Religion?

Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 10:56 am

Religion is a cross-cultural universal, even though not every human being professes faith in God or some other supernatural being. Those of us who are atheist or agnostic make up 6 percent of the American population. A further 14 percent say they are not affiliated with any particular religion.

Read more
Culture
3:43 am
Sun April 13, 2014

Statue Of A Homeless Jesus Startles A Wealthy Community

The Rev. David Buck sits next to the Jesus the Homeless statue that was installed in front of his church, St. Alban's Episcopal, in Davidson, N.C.
John Burnett NPR

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 7:40 am

A new religious statue in the town of Davidson, N.C., is unlike anything you might see in church.

The statue depicts Jesus as a vagrant sleeping on a park bench. St. Alban's Episcopal Church installed the homeless Jesus statue on its property in the middle of an upscale neighborhood filled with well-kept townhomes.

Jesus is huddled under a blanket with his face and hands obscured; only the crucifixion wounds on his uncovered feet give him away.

The reaction was immediate. Some loved it; some didn't.

Read more
Culture
4:43 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

Millennials 'Talk To God,' But Fewer Rely On Religion, Survey Finds

Mormon missionaries walk through the halls at the Missionary Training Center in Provo, Utah, in January 2013. A new survey by Carnegie Mellon University shows that more millennials report they "talk to God" than turn to religion for guidance.
Rick Bowmer AP

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 6:35 am

Barely half of millennials say they look to religion for guidance, but a higher percentage "talk to God," suggesting that the 18-to-34 demographic is more spiritual than sectarian, according to a new survey by the Integrated Innovation Institute at Carnegie Mellon University.

The survey of 2,000 U.S. men and women, ages 18-34, found that 62 percent said they talk to God, while 52 percent said they look to religion for guidance.

Read more

Pages