What's happening with Louisiana's schools, colleges, universities, and ongoing education reform.

Southern University Looking to Authorize Charters

Oct 16, 2015
John Oubre | Southern University

Southern University's Board of Supervisors voted for the university to apply as a local charter school authorizer last month. If the state Board of Elementary and Secondary Education approves their application, Southern University will be the first university system to be a local charter authorizer in Louisiana.

Paul Boger / Southern Education Desk

Football, basketball, baseball, gymnastics. College sports are a way of life in the South. Fans pack into stadiums or glue themselves to televisions to watch their favorite teams battle it out. But the pressure on a young person to succeed on the field or court is only half the battle.

College athletes are also expected to succeed in the classroom.

Amy Jeffries / Southern Education Desk

When it comes to Division I football, Southern states including Alabama, Florida, Georgia, and Louisiana, produce the largest number of recruits per capita.

New NCAA rules take effect for college athletes next fall. A 2.0 GPA and a decent ACT score won’t be enough anymore. To avoid the bench, freshmen will have to come in with a 2.3 GPA in core classes — reading, math, science, and social studies. And players in high school — where standards are generally lower — are feeling it.

Dan Carsen / Southern Education Desk

Across the South, college football is in full swing. But football is just one of dozens of NCAA sports. In any season, student-athletes are pushing themselves on the field, in the gym, and in the classroom. They get scholarships and generate billions of dollars, but they also get hurt and struggle with their studies on top of what’s basically a demanding full-time job. In Part One of our series “All in the Game,” our Alabama reporter looks at tensions between sports and academics through the eyes of the athletes themselves.

Paul Boger

States across the U-S have increasingly been turning to charter schools in an effort to bolster struggling public school systems. Two of the most recent states to adopt the controversial form of education are Mississippi and Alabama. As part of a Southern Education Desk series examining charter schools in the South, we turn to Mississippi Public Broadcasting‘s Paul Boger for a report on how those states are adopting to the alternative form of public education.