Education

Education
8:56 am
Mon May 19, 2014

If You Want To Teach Kids History, Try Grossing Them Out First

In her new book Bugged, Sarah Albee explores history through the lens of insects — including how they spread disease, how they influence conflicts, and how they can be a tasty snack.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 6:46 am

How would a man in a suit of armor go to the bathroom? That inquiry into medieval sanitation is just one of many unlikely topics that have come up around Sarah Albee's dinner table. Albee, a children's book author, has been trying to get middle schoolers interested in history. Her strategy is to look at it through the lens of something that gets kids' attention, namely: things that are gross.

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Education
9:44 am
Sat May 17, 2014

What Parents Need To Know About Big Data And Student Privacy

Empty classroom with no students
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 1:53 pm

My first brush with professional journalism — and with violations of student privacy — came when I was a sophomore at Yale. It was 1999, and George W. Bush, a Yale alumnus, was running for president.

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Education
4:46 am
Sat May 17, 2014

Nostalgia For What's Been Lost Since 'Brown V. Board'

This racially segregated Monroe Elementary School class from March 1953 shows Linda and Terry Lynn Brown, who, with their parents, initiated the Brown v. Board of Education case that helped propel school integration.
Carl Iwasaki Getty Image

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 12:41 pm

Brown v. Board of Education became the law of the land when it struck down de jure segregation in Topeka, Kan., on May 17, 1954, saying, "We conclude that, in the field of public education, the doctrine of 'separate but equal' has no place. Separate facilities are inherently unequal."

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Education
2:39 am
Fri May 16, 2014

Before 'Brown V. Board,' Mendez Fought California's Segregated Schools

Sylvia Mendez was a young girl in the 1940s when her parents fought for Latinos to have access to white schools in the California court case Mendez v. Westminster. They won in 1947.
Shereen Marisol Meraji NPR

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 9:51 pm

Sylvia Mendez says the only reason she wanted to go to an all-white school in California's Westminster District in the 1940s was because of its beautiful playground. The school that she and other Latino students were forced to attend didn't have monkey bars or swings.

"I was 9 years old," she says. "I just thought my parents wanted us to go to the nice-looking school."

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Education
3:05 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

At A New Orleans High School, Marching Band Is A Lifeline For Kids

The Edna Karr High School marching band had fewer than 40 members four years ago. Today, more than 80 students march in the band.
Keith O'Brien NPR

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 2:31 pm

Editor's Note: This is a story about a high school band. It is a story that demands to be heard, even more so than read. Please click on the audio player, above, to listen. Audio will be available around 6:30 p.m. EDT.

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Education
9:17 am
Wed May 14, 2014

Behind The Test: The Rules And Regulations Leading To Reliable LEAP Data

Flickr user midnightpeace_90

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 11:05 pm

WWNO continues its series “Behind the Test” with a look at test security. The paper booklets, and students’ answers inside, can determine things like teacher pay or the very existence of a school. It takes a lot of effort — and people — to keep the testing materials secure through delivery, administering the test, turning them in and then scoring.

The booklets and answer sheets for Louisiana’s LEAP tests come from a company called Data Recognition Corporation in Minnesota. When the Recovery School District's tests arrive they go straight to a warehouse.

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Education
3:53 pm
Tue May 13, 2014

Behind The Test: Schools Turn To Social Workers, Relaxation Techniques To Deal With LEAP Test Strain

Kevin and Byroneshia doing a guided imagery activity. LEAP tests put entire schools under enormous stress.

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 8:25 am

WWNO continues its series "Behind the Test" with a look at standardized testing through the lens of test anxiety. In the weeks leading up to the LEAP test, teachers do a lot to prepare students: drilling them on crucial skills, giving out practice tests, even holding pep rallies to boost confidence. But what about preparing students to cope with test-related anxiety?

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Education
3:06 pm
Tue May 13, 2014

State Spots In Preschool Declining, Report Finds

Student-teacher ratio is one component of high-quality preschool.
Barnaby Wasson Flickr

Public preschool enrollment fell slightly last year, according to a report released today by researchers at Rutgers University.

About 9,000 fewer children attended public pre-K programs in 2013 than in 2012, the report from the university's National Institute for Early Education Research says. It's the first time since researchers began examining this issue in 2002 that the numbers have fallen.

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Education
9:11 am
Fri May 9, 2014

What's Your Major? 4 Decades Of College Degrees, In 1 Graph

Quoctrung Bui/NPR

Originally published on Fri May 9, 2014 9:28 am

In honor of college graduation season, we made a graph. It answers a few questions we had: What is the mix of bachelor's degrees awarded today, and how has the mix changed over the past several decades?

Hover over the graph to see how the popularity of each category changes over time. Click or tap to see a category individually.

A few notes:

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Education
3:29 pm
Wed May 7, 2014

Department Of Education Brings Home A Disappointing Report Card

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 8:59 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Flat, stagnant, static, those are words that the U.S. Department of Education has used to describe the latest reading and math scores for the nation's 12th graders.

As NPR's Claudio Sanchez reports, most high school seniors appear to be graduating without the skills they need to succeed in college or work.

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