Science and Environment

Science and Environment
11:41 am
Sat October 18, 2014

American Intruder Lurks In Scottish Streams, Clawed And Hungry

In the northwestern United States, this crayfish would be just a friendly bit of local fauna. But in Scotland, it's an invasive species wreaking havoc on trout streams.
Ari Shapiro NPR

Originally published on Sun October 12, 2014 12:14 pm

Forget Nessie: there's another insidious creature living in the waters of Scotland.

The story starts in the streams and lakes of the northwestern United States, where North American signal crayfish are a familiar sight. Turn over a rock and you may well encounter one.

But in Scottish streams and lochs, these creatures are intruders.

In the United States, we often hear about invasive Asian carp, zebra mussels or snakehead fish from China that take over American waterways. It's a two-way street: American species are causing chaos in other parts of the world, too.

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Science and Environment
4:07 pm
Wed October 1, 2014

When Can A Big Storm Or Drought Be Blamed On Climate Change?

Melbourne visitors and residents took to the waters of Australia's St. Kilda Beach in January 2013 to escape a fierce heat wave.
Scott Barbour Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 1, 2014 7:52 pm

Nowadays, when there's a killer heat wave or serious drought somewhere, people wonder: Is this climate change at work? It's a question scientists have struggled with for years. And now there's a new field of research that's providing some answers. It's called "attribution science" — a set of principles that allow scientists to determine when it's a change in climate that's altering weather events ... and when it isn't.

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Science and Environment
4:05 am
Wed September 24, 2014

Can Climate Legislation Pass In Washington's Political Environment?

Originally published on Wed September 24, 2014 12:31 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

We're going to find out now more about the Obama administration's climate plans from U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz. Secretary Moniz, welcome to the program.

U.S. ENERGY SECRETARY ERNEST MONIZ: Thank you very much, Audie.

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Science and Environment
2:38 am
Tue September 16, 2014

Too Few University Jobs For America's Young Scientists

Victoria Ruiz (left), a postdoctoral fellow in immunology, works with Brianna Delgado, a high school student that she mentors, at the Blaser Lab, inside NYU's Langone Medical Center in New York, NY.
Ramsay de Give for NPR

Originally published on Tue September 30, 2014 7:21 pm

Imagine a job where about half of all the work is being done by people who are in training. That's, in fact, what happens in the world of biological and medical research.

In the United States, more than 40,000 temporary employees known as postdoctoral research fellows are doing science at a bargain price. And most postdocs are being trained for jobs that don't actually exist.

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Science and Environment
4:13 pm
Tue September 9, 2014

U.S. Gets Middling Marks On 2014 'State Of Birds' Report Card

"The State of the Birds" 2014 report found that red knots (above) and other shorebirds are among the most threatened groups in the U.S. More than half of U.S. shorebird species are on the report's Watch List — species that are currently endangered or at risk.
Gerrit Vyn The Smithsonian Institution

Originally published on Wed September 10, 2014 10:30 am

All is not well with the nation's birds. The most comprehensive study ever of birds in America is out today, and it says many populations are in steep decline, even as others are doing well.

The report, called "The State of the Birds," comes from the federal government, universities and conservation groups — 23 organizations that have spent years examining bird populations, as well as habitats where the various species live.

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Science and Environment
11:07 am
Mon September 8, 2014

For Lack Of Mississippi Silt, The Gulf Is Losing Coastal Land

Thousands of miles of Louisiana's coastline have been disappearing over the last century. NPR's Lynn Neary talks to fishing guide Ryan Lambert about what's happening to his community.

 

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Science and Environment
3:42 pm
Wed September 3, 2014

Residents Worry Urban Drilling Will Turn Downtowns Into Oil Towns

When Dawn Gioia first received a request to lease mineral rights under her home, in a downtown neighborhood in Brighton, Colo., she thought it was a scam.
Lesley McClurg Colorado Public Radio

Originally published on Thu September 4, 2014 2:18 pm

Dawn Gioia lives just two blocks away from City Hall in Brighton, Colo., just north of Denver. She never expected to receive a thick envelope from Mid-Continent Energy in the mail, proposing she sell mineral rights for oil and gas drilling.

At first, she thought it was a scam.

"One of these forms asks you for all your tax information and Social Security numbers, so that was something that sort of caught me off guard," she says.

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Science and Environment
5:37 pm
Sat August 30, 2014

When Wildlife Documentaries Jump The Shark

Originally published on Thu September 4, 2014 4:54 pm

This summer's Shark Week on the Discovery Channel was the highest-rated in the special's 27-year history. But that success has also brought complaints.

The network has been criticized for pushing entertainment at the cost of science, with "documentaries" that advance dubious theories — or are entirely fake. Discovery Channel has aired specials about everything from mythical monster sharks in Louisiana's rivers to long-extinct Megalodons supposedly still swimming the seas.

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Science and Environment
9:55 am
Sat August 30, 2014

Vanishing Points In Terrebonne Parish Part Deaux

Chauvin Sculpture Garden.

Originally published on Thu November 6, 2014 3:31 pm

The best way to understand Louisiana’s rapidly changing coastal map may be to look from above. That’s how you see the small highways headed south, slim like bony fingers, disappearing into a blue backdrop. What a map can’t express are the histories, hopes and desires of communities along the bayous of the Gulf Coast.

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Science and Environment
6:37 pm
Tue August 26, 2014

River Diversions And The Fate Of Louisiana's Coast

The Wax Lake Delta, created by a diversion of the Atchafalaya River.

Originally published on Thu November 6, 2014 3:28 pm

A big part of Louisiana’s coastal Master Plan centers around something called “diversions.” Fresh water from the Mississippi River is diverted so that the water, and the silt it carries, can rebuild the sinking coast. But this technique, a centerpiece of Louisiana's coastal Master Plan, is contentious.

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