Science and Environment

Science and Environment
9:13 am
Sat August 23, 2014

Vanishing Points In Terrebonne Parish

Provost Cemetery in Dulac, Louisiana.

Originally published on Thu November 6, 2014 3:29 pm

The best way to understand Louisiana’s rapidly changing coastal map may be to look from above. That’s how you see the small highways headed South, slim like bony fingers, disappearing into a blue backdrop. What a map can’t express are the histories, hopes and desires of communities along the bayous of the Gulf Coast.

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Science and Environment
4:36 pm
Fri August 8, 2014

Lake Erie's Toxic Bloom Has Ohio Farmers On The Defensive

Paul Herringshaw says farmers like him have been taking steps to reduce crop runoff for years.
Sarah Jane Tribble WCPN

Originally published on Fri August 8, 2014 6:15 pm

A giant algae bloom is still making the waters in the western part of Lake Erie look like a thick, green pea soup. Toxins in that muck seeped into the water supply of Toledo, Ohio, last weekend, forcing officials to ban nearly half a million people from using tap water. A big cause of the algae proliferation isn't a mystery — it's crop runoff. And local farmers are on the defensive.

Six miles from Lake Erie is Ron Schimming's 400-acre soybean and corn farm.

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Science and Environment
9:28 am
Wed August 6, 2014

How To Translate Sight Into Sound? It's All In The Vibrations

Originally published on Wed August 6, 2014 8:47 am

Melissa Block talks to Abe Davis, a graduate student at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Davis helped author a paper on a visual system to detect sound, which can recover intelligible speech from the vibrations of a potato chip bag photographed through soundproof glass.

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Science and Environment
4:32 pm
Fri August 1, 2014

Local Photographer Captures Changing Louisiana Coast From A New Perspective

Marsh Degradation

Originally published on Thu November 6, 2014 3:36 pm

New Orleans native and local fine arts photographer Michel Varisco developed a curiosity about the Gulf Coast region at a young age. With a mother who is a former biochemist, and engineer dad, she started learning on family road trips. Her dad would explain the Bonnet Carré Spillway, or point out dead trees while driving down LA1 to Grande Isle. 

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Science and Environment
4:13 pm
Tue July 29, 2014

Want To Reduce Your Carbon Footprint? Choose Mackerel Over Shrimp

A fisherman pulls a basket filled with anchovies aboard a fishing boat off of Peru's northern port of Chimbote, in 2012. Peru is the world's top fishmeal exporter, producing about a third of worldwide supply.
Enrique Castro-Mendivil Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu July 31, 2014 3:05 pm

Small fatty fish like mackerel, herring, sardines and anchovies are high in omega-3s, vitamin D and low on the food chain.

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Science and Environment
1:53 pm
Tue July 29, 2014

Widely Used Insecticides Are Leaching Into Midwest Rivers

The U.S. Geological Survey found that neonicotinoids are leaching into streams and rivers in the Midwest, including the Missouri River, shown here in Leavenworth, Kan.
Dean Bergmann iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 3:42 pm

A class of insecticides called neonicotinoids, which are used on a lot of big corn and soybean fields, has been getting a pretty bad rap lately.

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Science and Environment
8:03 am
Fri July 25, 2014

Working Coast Camp In Houma Teaches Children About Big Industry

The Working Coast campers set out fishing on their last day.

Originally published on Thu November 6, 2014 3:40 pm

South Louisiana’s Terrebonne Parish has low unemployment — there are lots of jobs in offshore services. So many that there could be a shortage of locals with the skills needed. The Working Coast summer camp in Houma teaches kids about the big industries in their area, and aims to get them excited about those career paths.

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Science and Environment
4:08 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

Pop Quiz: 20 Percent Chance Of Rain. Do You Need An Umbrella?

Will it rain or not? How you interpret the forecast could mean the difference between getting soaked or staying safe.
Maria Pavlova iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 4:04 pm

This week, All Things Considered is exploring how people interpret probability. What does it mean to us, for example, when a doctor says an operation has a 70 percent chance of success?

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Science and Environment
4:08 pm
Tue July 15, 2014

What's Going On In There? How Babies' Brains Practice Speech

The magnetoencephalograph can record electrical signals from a baby's brain without requiring the child to be perfectly still.
University of Washington

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 7:08 am

A baby's first words may seem spur of the moment, but really, the little ones have practiced their "Mamas" and "Dadas" for months in their minds.

Using what looks like a hair dryer from Mars, researchers from the University of Washington have taken the most precise peeks yet into the fireworks display of neural activity that occurs when infants listen to people speak.

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Science and Environment
2:08 pm
Mon July 14, 2014

Do We Choose Our Friends Because They Share Our Genes?

Originally published on Thu July 17, 2014 10:15 am

People often talk about how their friends feel like family. Well, there's some new research out that suggests there's more to that than just a feeling. People appear to be more like their friends genetically than they are to strangers, the research found.

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