Health

Health
4:51 pm
Sat November 8, 2014

Obese Women Make Less Money, Work More Physically Demanding Jobs

A recent study found obese women are more likely than other women to work physically demanding jobs, like the kind that call for hard hats. They're less likely to work in jobs that require a lot of interaction with clients and customers — jobs that, on average, make more money.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Sun November 9, 2014 6:34 am

Being overweight hurts your earnings, and being an overweight woman is particularly tough on income. Back in 2004, a landmark study found that a 65-pound increase in a woman's weight is associated with a 9-percent drop in earnings. The authors of the study noted that, in terms of wages, the "obesity penalty" basically amounted to losing three years of experience in the workplace.

Read more
Health
11:31 am
Thu November 6, 2014

Fewer Babies Are Born Prematurely, But Many Still Suffer

The March of Dimes gives the United States an overall "C" grade in preventing preterm births.
Courtesy of The March of Dimes Foundation

The number of babies born too early dropped to 11.4 percent of all births in 2013, the best number in 17 years.

But that's still more than 450,000 children being born too early. Those babies face in increased risk of death, and those who survive are more likely to have problems including intellectual disability, vision or hearing loss, cerebral palsy and breathing trouble.

Read more
Health
6:36 am
Thu November 6, 2014

Sideline Robot Helps Trainers Spot Football Concussions

Go Big Green! Dartmouth is testing the VGo robot to help diagnose concussions when neurologists aren't at the game.
Mark Washburn Courtesy of Dartmouth-Hitchcock

Originally published on Thu November 6, 2014 5:03 pm

With the fall season come littered leaves, new television lineups and the sport that can't stop stirring up controversy: football.

Rough tackles and concussions worry many parents. And no wonder. Research cited by the American Association of Neurological Surgeons suggests that more than a third of college football players have had one concussion and 20 percent have had more than one.

Read more
Health
2:07 pm
Mon November 3, 2014

On the Ballot: Tying Up Hospital Funding

Should Louisiana hospitals be guaranteed a set amount of state health care funding—if they put up part of the money themselves? That’s what Constitutional Amendment 2 on Tuesday’s ballot is asking voters to decide.

Read more
Health
4:52 pm
Thu October 30, 2014

Ebola Researchers Banned From Medical Meeting In New Orleans

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 11:45 am

Louisiana health officials say that anyone who's been in an Ebola-affected country over the last three weeks will be quarantined in their hotel rooms.

The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene is telling researchers who've recently traveled to Ebola-affected parts of West Africa that they can't come to the society's annual meeting. That wasn't the medical group's idea.

Read more
Health
9:56 am
Thu October 30, 2014

Why It's OK To Worry About Ebola, And What's Truly Scary

A protester outside the White House demands a halt to all flights to the United States from West Africa.
Mladen Antonov AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 9:19 am

Public health types are getting increasingly annoyed with people freaking out about Ebola in the United States, from governors to the general public. It's easy to see why; when I heard a swim coach was getting questions from parents worried that their children might get Ebola from the pool water, it was hard not to cue the eye roll.

On the other hand, I suspect I'm not the only person whose husband asked her to buy chlorine bleach and gloves the next time I went to the store.

Read more
Health
10:53 am
Mon October 27, 2014

On the Ballot: To Lock In or Lock Up Care for Elderly?

On Nov. 4, Louisiana voters are being asked — as they were in 2012 — to decide whether to protect nursing homes from future budget cuts.


Read more
Health
4:49 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

What's My Risk Of Catching Ebola?

Data sources: David Ropeik/Harvard University, National Weather Service, World Health Organization, Northeastern University Laboratory for the Modeling of Biological and Socio-Technical Systems, National Geographic, United States Census
Adam Cole and Ryan Kellman NPR

Originally published on Sat October 25, 2014 9:57 pm

Health officials are saying it. Scientists are saying it. Heck, even many journalists are saying it: "The risk of Ebola infection remains vanishingly small in this country," The New York Times wrote Wednesday.

But what does that mean? Are you more likely to be struck by lightning or catch Ebola?

Read more
Health
3:30 pm
Tue October 21, 2014

Hospitals Struggle To Beat Back Serious Infections

An official at the University of Michigan Health System in Ann Arbor says its mix of patients helps explain the infection rates.
Scott C. Soderberg Courtesy of University of Michigan Health System

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 2:58 pm

While Ebola stokes public anxiety, more than 1 in 6 hospitals — including some top medical centers — are having trouble stamping out less exotic but sometimes deadly infections, federal records show.

Read more
Health
4:19 pm
Mon October 20, 2014

Along with Better Traffic Flow, Better Healthcare Flow

Between Essen, Bluebonnet, Perkins and I-10 in Baton Rouge, there’s a whole bunch of health clinics and medical facilities – including Our Lady of the Lake Hospital, Baton Rouge General, The Baton Rouge Clinic, and Pennington Biomedical. 

Chances are you'll get stuck in traffic when you drive through that corridor. 

The Baton Rouge Area Foundation has set out to address that problem by creating a new Health District that would not only mean you sit through fewer traffic lights, but that health care is delivered more efficiently. 

Read more

Pages