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NPR Story
2:11 pm
Mon July 14, 2014

Film Explores Race, Culture And Politics In Post-Katrina New Orleans

Political operative Barbara Lacen-Keller denouncing some of New Orleans electoral tactics. (Andrew Kolker)

Originally published on Mon July 14, 2014 2:17 pm

A new film about race and politics in post-Katrina New Orleans premiers tonight on PBS, as part of the documentary series POV — Point-of-View.

Getting Back To Abnormal” centers on a contentious 2010 race for New Orleans City Council, between an African-American preacher and a polarizing white incumbent named Stacy Head, for a seat that was long held by a black representative.

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Science and Environment
2:08 pm
Mon July 14, 2014

Do We Choose Our Friends Because They Share Our Genes?

Originally published on Thu July 17, 2014 10:15 am

People often talk about how their friends feel like family. Well, there's some new research out that suggests there's more to that than just a feeling. People appear to be more like their friends genetically than they are to strangers, the research found.

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Health
1:11 pm
Mon July 14, 2014

Why A Spoonful Of Medicine Can Be A Big Safety Risk For Kids

Ordinary spoons vary widely in size and shape. Confusing regular spoons for accurate measurements of teaspoons and tablespoons can lead to accidental overdoses.
Meredith Rizzo NPR

Originally published on Mon July 14, 2014 4:15 pm

We've all done it. The bottle of Pepto-Bismol says to take two tablespoons, so you grab the nearest spoon from the silverware drawer and drink down two of those. It's probably pretty close, right?

Maybe not. With all the different sizes and shapes of spoons out there — soup spoons, dessert spoons, grapefruit spoons and coffee spoons, to name just a few — who knows if the spoon you chose is actually close to a tablespoon.

And when it comes to children, that lack of precision can be dangerous.

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Culture
11:24 am
Mon July 14, 2014

Church Of England Will Allow Women To Serve As Bishops

Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, shown here in Kenya last October, supported the decision to ordain women as bishops.
Ben Curtis AP

Originally published on Mon July 14, 2014 12:44 pm

The Church of England voted Monday to ordain women as bishops.

Justin Welby, the Archbishop of Canterbury and the church's spiritual leader, said before the vote that the public would find it "almost incomprehensible" if the church's General Synod did not approve the change.

A similar proposal was narrowly defeated in 2012. A revised proposal had been put to a vote and approved in 43 of the church's 44 dioceses, according to the BBC.

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The Jim Engster Show
10:07 am
Mon July 14, 2014

MONDAY: Longtime Political Consultant Raymond Strother

Today on The Jim Engster Show, longtime political consultant Raymond Strother joins us for the full hour to discuss the upcoming U.S. Senate battle: Democrats v. Republicans. Considered the father of modern political consulting, Strother's former clients include Bill Clinton, Al Gore, and Gary Hart. He predicts a Landrieu victory in the Louisiana Senate election coming up this November; talks on how campaigns strategically target gender; and even chimes in on Governor Bobby Jindal's bid for the presidency.


Education
7:18 am
Mon July 14, 2014

Teaching 4-Year-Olds To Feel Better

Originally published on Mon July 14, 2014 8:35 pm

You're 4 years old, building a block tower. Another kid runs up and knocks it down. What do you do? A) Tell her that's against the rules. B) Go tell a teacher. C) Hit her. D) Start to cry. E) What did you say again?

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Health
6:36 am
Mon July 14, 2014

Putting a Life-Saving Drug in More Hands - Legal or Not

A Baton Rouge EMS paramedic holds a single dose pre-filled syringe of Nalaxone, otherwise known as Narcan. Baton Rouge paramedics have been carrying the drug for years.
Credit Ann Marie Awad / WRKF News

Heroin-related deaths in East Baton Rouge Parish spiked last year - the Coroner's office recorded 35 fatalities. Only Jefferson and Orleans Parish had as many.

To try to stop the deaths, a new law will allow not just paramedics, but all first responders to carry the drug Narcan - which can reverse the effects of an opiate overdose within seconds.

But some activists say the law doesn't go far enough. They say they'll keep distributing Narcan themselves directly to drug users illegally.

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Health
3:29 am
Mon July 14, 2014

To Make Children Healthier, A Doctor Prescribes A Trip To The Park

Zarr with Kellsi Aguilar and her father, Felipe, in Zarr's Washington, D.C., office.
Sam Sanders/NPR

Originally published on Fri July 18, 2014 12:08 pm

When Dr. Robert Zarr wanted a young patient to get more exercise, he gave her an unusual prescription: Get off the bus to school earlier.

"She has to take a bus to the train, then a train to another bus, then that bus to her school," says Zarr, a pediatrician at Unity Health Care, a clinic that serves low-income and uninsured families in Washington, D.C. So the prescription read: "Walk the remaining four blocks on the second bus on your route to school from home, every day."

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Law and Order
2:28 am
Mon July 14, 2014

How Banning One Question Could Help Ex-Offenders Land A Job

Sherman Justice says he struggled when he got out of prison after serving time for robbery and drug trafficking.
Pam Fessler NPR

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 6:40 pm

Washington, D.C., is expected to join four states and several cities soon in prohibiting companies from asking job applicants — up front — if they have a criminal record.

It's part of a growing movement called Ban the Box, a reference to that box on a job application form that asks, "Have you ever been convicted of a crime?"

Advocates for the laws say having to check the box prevents many ex-offenders from getting a fair shot at a job.

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Culture
5:37 pm
Sun July 13, 2014

Science Vs. Religion: Beyond The Western Traditions

Buddhist monks release a lantern into the air at Borobudur temple in Magelang, Central Java, Indonesia. Where does their tradition fit into the science vs. religion debate?
Ulet Ifansasti Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 14, 2014 7:42 am

In the United States, the debate between science and religion seems to be powered by a perpetual motion machine. The claims that Neil deGrasse Tyson's inspired Cosmos series was anti-religious stands as the latest salvo in a long battle that generates lots heat but very little light. Having been in many of these debates, both formally and informally, I'm often struck by how narrow the discussion remains.

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