Middle East
3:07 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

Syrian Opposition Movement Hampered By Fractures

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 5:02 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Now to efforts aimed at restructuring the Syrian opposition. The main opposition group, the Syrian National Council, is increasingly seen as ineffective, so people trying to bring down the government of President Bashar al-Assad are meeting right now in the Persian Gulf state of Qatar. NPR's Kelly McEvers is there and as she reports, the goal is to give the opposition more credibility with Syrians and the international community.

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Shots - Health News
3:02 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

What Health-Minded Smartphone Users Have In Common With Obama Voters

Elizabeth Ball checks her phone while waiting to vote Monday in Bowling Green, Ohio.
J.D. Pooley AP

Maybe I've got too many election results on my brain.

But the Pew Research Center's report about how people are using their mobile phones to get health information sent me to the data from the exit polls. Really.

Why?

The bottom line of the Pew report is that cellphone "owners who are Latino, African American, between the ages of 18-49, or hold a college degree are also more likely to gather health information" than other people on their mobile phones.

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The Two-Way
2:04 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

Pentagon Says Iran Fired On Unarmed U.S. Drone Flying Over Persian Gulf

In this Sept. 6, 2007 photo, an MQ-1 Predator unmanned aerial vehicle flies over a range in Nevada.
MSgt. Scott Reed AP

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 2:07 pm

Pentagon Press Secretary George Little said that Iranian warplanes fired on an unarmed U.S. drone in the Persian Gulf on Nov. 1.

According to Reuters, Little said the MQ1 Predator drone, which returned safely to its base, was in international waters at the time. Reuters adds:

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Shots - Health News
1:46 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

Polio Hides Out In A Few 'Sanctuaries' In Nigeria

Ado Ibrahim carries his son Aminu through a village in northern Nigeria. Aminu, 4, was paralyzed by polio in August.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Fri November 9, 2012 3:05 pm

Nigeria is the world's epicenter for polio. It's the only place where cases are ticking up, and it's been the source of outbreaks in other countries since 2003.

There was a disappointing update from public health officials Thursday about the polio situation in Nigeria. Despite beefed-up efforts to vaccinate kids and a flood of new resources, Nigeria still hasn't turned the corner on polio.

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NPR Story
1:45 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

Author Warns 'Second Nuclear Age' Is Here

Second Nuclear Age

Originally published on Sun November 11, 2012 7:34 am

Since the end of the Cold War, many Americans have come to the conclusion we don't need nuclear weapons anymore and ought to focus on reduction of stockpiles as quickly as possible. The problem, according to Yale professor Paul Bracken, is that the other countries that have nuclear weapons view them very differently.

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From Our Listeners
1:03 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

Letters: Hurricane Sandy And The Snow Storm

Originally published on Fri November 9, 2012 1:34 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

With all the election news, we couldn't get to it earlier, so it's Thursday and time to get to your comments.

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Election 2012
1:03 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

What Did The Billions The Campaigns Spent Buy?

Originally published on Fri November 9, 2012 1:34 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Before the election recedes too far, there are a couple more takeaways that deserve attention. One is the money. Spending in the 2012 campaign reached record heights. Some estimates put the total at more than $6 billion, and the new outside groups, the superPACs and the nonprofits, spent more than a billion to buy maybe one million television ads. In a moment, the effect of that unprecedented flow of cash.

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Asia
1:03 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

In China, A Transition Of Power Begins

Originally published on Fri November 9, 2012 1:34 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

The contrast couldn't be clearer. On Tuesday night, crowds gathered to watch election returns. The candidates and their nervous supporters had no way to know who'd win. In Beijing, as the Communist Party Congress gathered, the government cleared Tiananmen Square to create an eerie scene one observer described as post-apocalyptic. China's new leaders are being chosen in secret and few have any idea how they proposed to direct policy.

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The Two-Way
12:42 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

Pee-peegate: 3-Year-Old's Whiz Leads To $2,500 'Public Urination' Ticket

Dillan Warden, the little guy who had to go.
KCTV

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 1:21 pm

While we were busy paying attention to storms and presidential politics earlier this week, we missed a story from Oklahoma that may just (insert four-letter euphemism for urine here) you off.

It seems that when 3-year-old Dillan Warden of Piedmont, Okla., (no joke!) had to "go" on Sunday he did what many little guys will do:

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Asia
12:32 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

Highly Scripted, China Moves Toward New Leaders

Chinese Communist Party leaders attend the opening session of the 18th Communist Party Congress at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, on Thursday. The meeting marks the beginning of a once-in-a-decade transfer of power.
Alexander F. Yuan AP

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 7:31 pm

Two days after the U.S. election, another major political development is unfolding on the other side of the world. China began its once-in-a-decade transition of power on Thursday with the opening of its 18th Communist Party Congress.

With its lack of personalities or political platforms, it is almost diametrically opposed to the hurly-burly of U.S. elections. In Beijing, the message was about fighting corruption and keeping the Communist Party in power.

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