Jon Hamilton is a correspondent for NPR's Science Desk. Currently he focuses on neuroscience, health risks, and extreme weather.

Following the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan, Hamilton was part of NPR's team of science reporters and editors who went to Japan to cover the crisis at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant.

Hamilton contributed several pieces to the Science Desk series "The Human Edge," which looked at what makes people the most versatile and powerful species on Earth. His reporting explained how humans use stories, how the highly evolved human brain is made from primitive parts, and what autism reveals about humans social brains.

Liz Halloran joined NPR in December 2008 as Washington correspondent for Digital News, taking her print journalism career into the online news world.

Halloran came to NPR from US News & World Report, where she followed politics and the 2008 presidential election. Before the political follies, Halloran covered the Supreme Court during its historic transition — from Chief Justice William Rehnquist's death, to the John Roberts and Samuel Alito confirmation battles. She also tracked the media and wrote special reports on topics ranging from the death penalty and illegal immigration, to abortion rights and the aftermath of the Amish schoolgirl murders.

Mark Memmott is one of the hosts of NPR's "The Two-Way" news blog.

"The Two-Way," which Memmott helped to launched when he came to NPR in 2009, focuses on breaking news, analysis, and the most compelling stories being reported by NPR News and other news media.

Before joining NPR, Memmott worked for nearly 25 years as a reporter and editor at USA Today. He focused on a range of coverage from politics, foreign affairs, economics, and the media. He's reported from places across the Unites States and the world, including half a dozen trips to Afghanistan in 2002-2003.

International Correspondent Anthony Kuhn official base is Jakarta, Indonesia, where he opened NPR's first bureau in that country in 2010. From there, he has covered Southeast Asia, and the gamut of natural and human diversity stretching from Myanmar to Fiji and Vietnam to Tasmania. During 2013-2014, he is covering Beijing, China, as NPR's Louisa Lim is on fellowship.

Jason Beaubien is NPR's Global Health and Development Correspondent on the Science Desk.

In this role, he reports on a range of health issues across the world including the mobilization of massive circumcision drives in Kenya; how Botswana, with one of the highest rates of HIV in the world, has managed to provide free, life-saving drugs to almost all who need them; and why Brazil's once model HIV/AIDS program is seen in decline.

Prior to moving into this assignment in 2012, Beaubien spent four years a NPR foreign correspondent covering Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean. From his base in Mexico City, Beaubien filed stories on politics in Cuba, hurricanes in Haiti, the FMLN victory in El Salvador, the world's richest man and Mexico's brutal drug war.

Isaac's Aftermath
12:00 am
Tue September 18, 2012

Isaac Surcharge on Electric Bills Likely

Entergy is estimating Hurricane Isaac caused between $400 to $500 million worth of damage to its power grid. Some of the repair costs is very likely to fall on customers.

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Bomb Threats
12:00 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Bomb Threat Empties LSU Campus

LSU reopened for students, faculty and staff and returned to normal operations shortly before 11 p.m. Monday after campus was shut down for about 12 hours due to a morning bomb threat.

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news_blog_wrkf

news blog for wrkf

Isaac's Aftermath
12:00 am
Fri September 14, 2012

Citrus Growers See Worst Damage Ever From Hurricane Isaac

The LSU Ag Center reports that Hurricane Isaac caused the worst damage in memory to citrus crops in Plaquemines Parish.

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Small Business
12:00 am
Thu September 13, 2012

Pinball Gets Design Firm's Gears Going

Past the stuffy, official government buildings of downtown Baton Rouge, you'll find the city's oldest commercial building. Up the creaky stairs off Lafayette Street and beyond the reception area is a big open room. Sometimes the design world gets a little noisy.

WRKF intern Claire Ohlsen visited the workspace and sent us this audio postcard.


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