NPR News

The parents of an American college student who died after more than a year in North Korean custody have sued North Korea, accusing the regime of torture and mistreatment.

Otto Warmbier was returned to the U.S. last June in a coma. He died soon afterward. A coroner concluded that his death was "due to an unknown insult more than a year prior to death."

A day after authorities announced the arrest of the suspected Golden State Killer, a few details have come into focus.

A can of dog repellant and a hammer from a suburban Sacramento Pay N' Save: the things that Joseph James DeAngelo shoplifted in 1979, costing him his job as a police officer in Auburn, Calif.

The coins and small items that the man then called the East Area Rapist would take during his attacks.

The as-yet-unidentified item discarded by DeAngelo that had a sample of his DNA on it — enough to provide the evidence leading to his arrest.

On the face of it, it was just another hair removal ad aimed at women in both Pakistan and India But this ad, like the others, would have slipped by unnoticed were it not for a social media uproar led by none other than Sana Mir, the former captain of the Pakistan women's cricket team.

The leaders of North and South Korea meet for the first time since 2007 on Friday. The meeting will set the stage for an expected meeting between President Trump and Kim Jong Un, where the North’s nuclear weapons program will be the main topic.

Author Kirk Johnson‘s new book “The Feather Thief” explores the 2009 theft of rare Victorian-era bird feathers from a British museum by American music student Edwin Rist, who was obsessed with using the feathers for exotic fishing lures.

Inspired by a poem, an art exhibit on sexual assault titled “What Were You Wearing?” re-creates outfits survivors had on when they were assaulted, alongside personal stories.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks with Jen Brockman, one of the creators of the installation and director of the Sexual Assault Prevention and Education Center at the University of Kansas.

Central American migrants are gathering near the U.S. border and say they plan to request asylum from the U.S. government on Sunday.

The asylum-seekers have been traveling north through Mexico for weeks. The caravan is an annual event, but this year's gathering has received unusual attention because of sharp criticism from President Trump.

Updated at 3:45 p.m. ET

At first glance, the scene probably looked familiar to many people in Phoenix: tens of thousands massing outside Chase Field on a bright Thursday afternoon in April, clad in red and rippling with anticipation. But that scene, if it were typical, would feature fans of the Arizona Diamondbacks — not the teachers who gathered near the baseball stadium with quite another event in mind.

As CNN's chief Washington correspondent, Jake Tapper is often focused on breaking news and the latest political stories, but the host of The Lead and State of the Union switched things up a bit for his latest project.

Tapper's new novel, The Hellfire Club, takes place in 1954 Washington, D.C., during Sen. Joseph McCarthy's Communist "witch hunt." He says that although 64 years separate his characters from today's political players, many of the themes apply.

Updated at 3:26 p.m. ET

Editor's note: This story contains a graphic description of sexual assault.

A Pennsylvania jury has found Bill Cosby guilty of three counts of aggravated indecent assault, setting up the comic legend for the possibility of years of imprisonment for drugging and sexually violating a woman 14 years ago on a couch in his Cheltenham, Pa., home.

Pages