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The Two-Way
10:45 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Man In 1984 Airline Hijacking Will Appear In U.S. Court

William Potts, an American accused of hijacking a Florida-bound flight and diverting it to Cuba in 1984, arrives at FBI headquarters after arriving Wednesday. Potts will make an initial court appearance today.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 12:54 pm

An American man who hijacked a plane to Cuba nearly 30 years ago will be in a U.S. court Thursday. William Potts returned from Cuba on Wednesday, saying he wanted to resolve lingering legal issues around his actions. He was arrested immediately.

Potts has previously expressed his desire to return to the U.S. He did so this week after taking a cab to the U.S. Interests Section in Cuba, which then sent him to Miami. Potts has said he hopes his time served in a Cuban prison will be taken into account by U.S. authorities.

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The Salt
10:41 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Washington State Says 'No' To GMO Labels

Cars in Tacoma, Wash., promote a "yes" vote on a ballot initiative that would have required genetically engineered foods to be labeled.
Ted S. Warren AP

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 12:58 pm

Voters appear to have defeated another attempt to require labels on genetically modified foods in Washington state. In early counts, the "no" campaign has what appears to be an insurmountable lead with 54 percent of votes.

The ballot initiative would require labels on the front of packages for most food products, seeds and commodities like soy or corn if they were produced using genetic engineering.

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NPR Story
10:37 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Art Revolution Blooms After Arab Spring

A painter uses his brush against a policeman armed with a mace. This mural is at the intersection of Muhammad Mahmud Street and Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt.
Mona Abaza

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 3:10 pm

In the U.S., graffiti is often condemned as vandalism. But during the Arab Spring, artists say city walls were often the only places where they could talk back to tyrants.

Street art can be found across the Middle East and North Africa, and the Arab Spring protests inspired an artistic revolution. The "Creative Dissent" exhibit at the Arab American National Museum in Dearborn, Michigan is putting that art on display.

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NPR Story
10:37 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Typing Love Letters To St. Louis

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is actually on her way to St. Louis Public Radio. Coming up, we'll take a look at the Arab Spring through street art, paintings and photographs. We'll hear from the curator and a featured artist from a new exhibit at the Arab American National Museum. But first, as I just mentioned, TELL ME MORE is taking the show to St. Louis tomorrow.

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NPR Story
10:37 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Doctor In Eastern Congo: 'Not Normal To Be Attacked'

The eastern Congo is known to some as the 'rape capital of the world' because nearly 50 women are raped there every hour. Dr. Denis Mukwege, a gynecologist, has put his practice, and his life on the line, to help save these women. Guest host Celeste Headlee speaks with him about his work.

NPR Story
10:37 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Congolese Rebels Put Down Arms, But Will Another Group Rise Up?

The Congolese rebel group M-23 is has been condemned for its years of brutal violence against civilians. But now, they've vowed to lay down their weapons. Guest host Celeste Headlee discusses the issue with NPR's Eastern Africa correspondent Gregory Warner.

Education
10:37 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Florida School District Aims To Block School-To-Prison Pipeline

The "school-to-prison pipeline" is what many activists call education policies that push troubled kids out of class, and into the criminal justice system. Broward County has taken steps to address those concerns by moving away from "zero tolerance" rules of discipline. Guest host Celeste Headlee discusses the new program with Marsha Ellison of the Broward County NAACP, and Michael Krezmien, a professor of student development at University of Massachusetts Amherst.

The Two-Way
10:13 am
Thu November 7, 2013

He's The One! Rubber Duckie Joins The Toy Hall Of Fame

Rubber duck gets his due: a place in the National Toy Hall of Fame.
Alexander Hassenstein Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 1:27 pm

Saying that "one toy stretches our gray matter; the other expands our sense of childhood wonder," the National Toy Hall of Fame announced Thursday that its 2013 inductees are the game of chess and the rubber duck.

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The Two-Way
9:46 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Lululemon Founder: Our Pants Won't Work For Some Women

Some of the clothes at a Lululemon store in Pasadena, Calif., earlier this year.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 10:04 am

Eight months after the company he founded had a big public relations problem because too much of some women's backsides could be seen through its yoga pants, Lululemon founder Chip Wilson has put the story back in the news.

"Quite frankly, some women's bodies just actually don't work" in Lululemon's pants, Wilson said this week on Bloomberg Television's Street Smart.

"It's about the rubbing through the thighs," he added, and "how much pressure is there."

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Business
9:10 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Twitter Makes Market Debut

The New York Stock Exchange is at the center of attention Thursday morning as Twitter goes public at $26 per share. That means company is expected to raise almost $2 billion. For the latest on this highly anticipated IPO, NPR's Zoe Chace talks with host David Greene.

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