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The Two-Way
9:41 am
Wed October 9, 2013

U.S. Suspending Millions In Military Aid To Egypt

Armored vehicles blocking Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, in August.
Amr Nabil AP

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 4:36 pm

Update at 4:39 p.m. ET. Recalibrating Assistance:

The State Department says the U.S. is "recalibrating" the assistance it provides Egypt.

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Parallels
8:54 am
Wed October 9, 2013

A Recurring Tragedy: Death In A Bangladesh Garment Factory

A Bangladeshi firefighter stands inside a damaged garment factory after it caught fire in Gazipur outside the capital, Dhaka, on Wednesday. The fire killed at least 10 people at the factory.
AP

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 2:06 pm

There's been a deadly fire at a garment factory in Bangladesh — the latest in a series of such tragedies and just six months after the worst disaster in the history of the global garment industry.

At least 10 people were killed at the Aswad garment factory outside the capital, Dhaka, early Wednesday. The immediate cause was not known. This factory, like others where tragedy has struck, produced clothes for a number of Western companies.

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Shots - Health News
8:32 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Nobel Goes To Scientists Who Took Chemistry Into Cyberspace

Classical mechanics, represented by Isaac Newton, typically doesn't play nicely with quantum mechanics, represented by Schrodinger's cat. But the 2013 Nobel laureates for chemistry figured out a way to get the two to work together.
Courtesy of the Nobel Prize

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 10:08 am

This year's Nobel Prize for chemistry is shared by three international scientists, who moved chemistry out of the lab and into the world of computing.

Together they developed tools for studying complex molecules — such as enzymes in the human body and plants' photosynthesis machinery — inside cyberspace.

These computerized tools allow scientists to design drugs more quickly and cheaply by doing their experiments with computer programs instead of inside rats and monkeys.

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Environment
7:47 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Twerking: Birds Do It. Bees Do It.

It's all in the booty. If a wild male sage grouse doesn't strut his stuff right, he may never mate. Ever.
Wyoming Game and Fish AP

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 10:13 am

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Law
7:45 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Supreme Court Weighs Easing Limits On Campaign Contributions

This artist rendering shows Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., seated (center) as attorney Bobby Burchfield argues during the Supreme Court's hearing on campaign finance Tuesday.
Dana Verkouteren AP

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 7:18 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court re-entered the debate over money and politics on Tuesday, hearing arguments in a case that could further erode limits on campaign cash.

Just three years ago, a narrow 5-to-4 conservative majority ruled that corporations are people, entitled to spend unlimited amounts on candidate elections as long as they do it separately from candidates' campaigns. On Tuesday, the court moved on to grapple with direct contributions to campaigns — in particular the aggregate limits on contributions by wealthy donors.

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From Our Listeners
7:44 am
Wed October 9, 2013

What Happens When You Die? Your Thoughts On The Afterlife

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 9:53 am

Polls show that a majority of Americans believe in life after death. Even so, many people choose to discuss the topic only within fairly tight circles of family, friends, clergy and others who share their faith.

So this week, All Things Considered is discussing the concept of an afterlife with leaders from several different schools of thought, including an evangelical Protestant pastor, an imam, a nun, a rabbi and a moral and political philosopher.

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Sweetness And Light
7:43 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Sick Of How U.S. Sports Are Run? Take A Look At Europe

Shadows of journalists are seen next to a FIFA logo after a recent press conference on controversy swirling around 2022 World Cup construction projects in Qatar.
Fabrice Coffrini AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 3:44 am

Complain all you want about how sports in the U.S. are run, but the playing fields aren't always greener on the other side.

In Europe, FIFA, the soccer federation, is dealing with problems associated with the 2022 World Cup's timing and venue. For one, after awarding the World Cup to Qatar, those running FIFA wonder now if it'd be better to play the games in winter when it will be cooler — only that's when all the European leagues are operating.

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Kitchen Window
7:41 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Your Favorite Beer May Become Your Favorite Ingredient

Peter Ogburn for NPR

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 11:10 am

Craft beer is having its moment. Microbreweries and craft beer operations are thriving, and weekend warriors spend hours in the garage honing recipes and sharing test batches. Beer is what friends drink when they get together. It's fun. It's accessible. You rarely see people sipping glasses of wine at a tailgate or a backyard barbecue.

Wine is what people think of for fine cooking — steaks with red wine reduction and mussels with white wine sauce. However, beer has a place on the stove, too.

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The Two-Way
7:22 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Top Stories: Nobel In Chemistry; Yellen Gets Nod As Fed Chair

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 9:37 am

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The Two-Way
7:12 am
Wed October 9, 2013

All Talk And No Do: Latest On The Shutdown And Debt Ceiling

The skies over the U.S. Capitol on Monday matched the mood as the partial government shutdown drags on and the nation edges closer to a possible default.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 11:53 am

One thing is certain: None of the key players in the federal spending impasse is very happy right now.

President Obama is expected to meet with House Democrats on Wednesday and other caucuses in the coming days, The Associated Press reports, amid hope that a deal can be made soon.

Here's a rundown of Wednesday's Morning Edition coverage on the partial government shutdown, which is bumping up against the debate over raising the debt ceiling.

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