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11:16 am
Thu October 10, 2013

A Philosopher's 'Afterlife': We May Die, But Others Live On

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 4:37 pm

Philosopher Samuel Scheffler doesn't believe in a traditional afterlife — that is, he doesn't think that a spirit or soul survives the body's physical death. But he does believe in another kind of afterlife: Regardless of what we think about our own life after death, Scheffler tells NPR's Robert Siegel, we all trust that others will continue to live after us. And, much like faith in a spiritual afterlife, that belief changes what we choose to do with our days on earth.

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All Tech Considered
11:06 am
Thu October 10, 2013

New Numbers Back Up Our Obsession With Phones

You check your phone a lot, even when it's not ringing or buzzing. But just how much? New numbers say it's more than 100 times a day.
Yunus Arakon iStockphoto.com

How's this for a sign of our digitally addicted times: Users swipe their screens to unlock their phones an average of 110 times a day, according to data from the app company Locket.

"We don't think we are unlocking our phones that many times because we don't sit down and count," says Yunha Kim, CEO and co-founder of Locket.

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Wisdom Watch
11:03 am
Thu October 10, 2013

'Love' Is The Real Essence Of MacArthur Genius' Art

Visual artist Carrie Mae Weems has been celebrated for her art and activism for decades, and now she can add a MacArthur 'Genius' Grant to her collection. In a 'Wisdom Watch' conversation with host Michel Martin, Weems discusses life, love and turning sixty.

Shots - Health News
10:55 am
Thu October 10, 2013

As Health Insurance Choices Multiply, Buyers Face Challenges

Sizing up insurance options can be tricky.
iStockphoto.com

The state health insurance marketplaces that opened Oct. 1 give consumers who are looking for coverage on the individual market a whole new way to shop for health plans. At the same time, health insurance brokers and insurers will also continue to sell plans directly to customers. Sorting out who's selling what can be a challenge.

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Author Interviews
10:52 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Rep. Gutierrez: I Am A Product Of The Civil Rights Movement

Rep. Luis Gutierrez at NPR's Washington DC studios.
Amy Ta NPR

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 1:03 pm

The nation is in the 10th day of a government shutdown, and the deadline over raising the debt limit is quickly approaching. But all that might seem like a day at the park for Congressman Luis Gutierrez (D-Ill.). He explains why in his new memoir Still Dreaming: My Journey from the Barrio to Capitol Hill.

He speaks with Tell Me More host Michel Martin about his political journey and the fight for immigration reform.

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Technology
10:20 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Latino Hackers: Encouraging Innovation

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 1:03 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

So we've been talking about science and getting people excited about science. You've probably already heard that Latinos are more likely to use social media sites and to access the Internet from mobile devices than other groups are. But the number of Latinos involved in developing the technology is not where many people would like it to be. Hispanics only make up about 4 percent of the people working in the computer industry, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

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Science
10:20 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Why Is The Higgs Boson A 'Big Whoop' For All Of Us?

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 1:03 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. We've talked before on this program about why Latinos in the U.S. are more likely to tweet and use other social media than other Americans. Today, we're going to hear from a Latino tech leader who wants to boost the Latino presence in the science and business of technology. We'll talk about that in just a few minutes.

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The Government Shutdown
10:12 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Boehner Proposes 6-Week Increase In Debt Limit

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning.

Seven days from now - according to the U.S. Treasury Department - the U.S. approaches the point where it can no longer pay its bills. The federal budget deficit has been dropping dramatically. But in the wake of the Great Recession, it is still very high.

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Politics
10:10 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Some Republicans Say Debt Limit Fuss Is A Lot Of Hype

Rep. Phil Gingrey, R-Ga., says it's "absolutely not true" to suggest that the U.S. can't pay its debts without raising the debt ceiling.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 4:51 pm

For weeks, economists and bankers have been warning that there will be catastrophic consequences if Congress fails raise the nation's borrowing limit.

They say it will mean the nation will default on its debt, which could rock U.S. and global markets. The Treasury has warned that it will exhaust the "extraordinary measures" it has been using to keep paying the nation's bills by Oct. 17.

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Parallels
10:03 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Will A Pakistani Teenager Win The Nobel Peace Prize?

Malala Yousafzai, 16, speaks in New York last month. Yousafzai was shot a year ago by the Taliban for her outspoken advocacy in favor of girls' education in Pakistan. She is considered one of the favorites for the Nobel Peace Prize, which will be announced Friday.
Ramin Talaie Getty Images

It hasn't been a great year for peace. War is raging in Syria, grinding conflicts drag on in Afghanistan and Iraq, and assorted insurgencies plague nations from Asia to Africa.

Yet the Nobel Peace Prize will be announced Friday, and one of the favorites would be a striking choice: Malala Yousafzai, the 16-year-old schoolgirl who was shot by the Taliban last year for her outspoken advocacy of girls' education in her native Pakistan.

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