NPR News

Pages

Law
11:16 am
Tue October 1, 2013

DOJ Voting Lawsuit: Absurd Or Critical?

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 1:56 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. My thanks to Celeste Headlee for sitting in for me on short notice. So today, the country woke up to the shutdown of the federal government. We've been hearing from you about how this is affecting you and your budgets and your families. We'll hear what you've been telling us and we'll hear from two of the business reporters we turn to often to find out what they're hearing about the long and short-term impact on the country. That's in just a few minutes.

Read more
Around the Nation
11:16 am
Tue October 1, 2013

When Teen Parties Go Viral

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 1:56 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
It's All Politics
11:07 am
Tue October 1, 2013

The Panda Cam? That's Shut Down, Too

A self-portrait taken by the NASA exploration rover Curiosity in Gale crater on Mars.
NASA AP

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 8:17 am

By now, you've probably heard that the federal government shut down at 12:01 a.m. ET Tuesday after members of Congress were unable to reach a budget agreement in time to keep the government funded.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:07 am
Tue October 1, 2013

1 In 8 Suffers From Chronic Hunger Globally, U.N. Report Says

Schoolgirls eat a free midday meal in Hyderabad, India, last month. India has offered such meals since the 1960s to persuade impoverished parents to send their children to school. A U.N. report released Tuesday finds modest progress in the worldwide fight against chronic hunger.
Mahesh Kumar A. AP

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 12:17 pm

Worldwide, roughly 1 in 8 people suffered from chronic hunger from 2011 to 2013, according to a new report from three U.N. food agencies.

They concluded that 842 million people didn't get enough food to lead healthy lives in that period, a slight drop from the 868 million in the previous report.

The modest change was attributed to several factors, from economic growth in developing countries to investments in agriculture. And in some countries, people have benefited from money sent home by migrant workers. But the gains were unevenly distributed, the report's authors say.

Read more
The Salt
10:46 am
Tue October 1, 2013

Now You Can Go To Harvard And Learn Cooking Science From Top Chefs

YouTube

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 12:50 pm

It's one part Food Network, one part Mr. Science, two big handfuls of DIY, and probably going to be a whole lot of fun.

Read more
Shots - Health News
10:45 am
Tue October 1, 2013

Exchange Shopping Starts Now, But No Need To Rush

Stephanie Groover of Independence Blue Cross provides information about coverage to commuters in Philadelphia on the opening day of the health insurance exchanges.
Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 4:26 pm

Well, today's the day health insurance marketplaces open for business. And despite a partial shutdown of the federal government and some technical jitters, they're available for insurance shoppers.

While Oct. 1 is a milestone in the implementation of the health law, other dates are likely more critical for consumers planning to shop for health insurance on their state marketplace.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:02 am
Tue October 1, 2013

What's The Forecast On Kepler-7B? Hot And Cloudy

An artist's rendition of Kepler-7b (left) with Jupiter for comparison.
NASA/JPL-Caltech/MIT

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 11:34 am

Scientists are reasonably sure that it's a cloudy day on Kepler-7b, a planet that orbits its star about 1,000 light-years away from us.

Using NASA's orbiting space telescopes, researchers publishing in Astrophysical Journal Letters say that for the first time they've been able to make a rudimentary map of the atmosphere of an extrasolar planet.

The team used faint visible light and infrared reflections from Kepler-7b to make their cloud map.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:27 am
Tue October 1, 2013

Snowden Is A Finalist For European Human Rights Award

Edward Snowden, seen here in a photo provided by The Guardian, is a finalist for the Sakharov Prize. Earlier this year, Snowden leaked classified information about secret U.S. surveillance programs.
AP

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 10:29 am

Edward Snowden, the former NSA contract worker who leaked documents detailing America's secret and broad surveillance activities, is on the short list of nominees for Europe's Sakharov Prize, which recognizes those who fight for human rights.

Other finalists include Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani schoolgirl who survived being shot in the head; and three political prisoners in Belarus.

Read more
Parallels
9:11 am
Tue October 1, 2013

Fearing Detention, Many Young Syrian Men Stay In The Shadows

Young men ride a horse cart in the northern Syrian city of Aleppo last year. Many young Syrian men stay indoors and off the street because they are afraid they may be detained as suspected rebels or rebel sympathizers.
Phillipe Desmazes AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 8:50 am

The author is a Syrian citizen living in Damascus who is not being further identified for safety reasons.

The young men of Syria account for many of those fighting on both sides of the country's civil war. Yet those on the sidelines of the conflict are facing heavy burdens of their own.

All over Syria, many young men, particularly those from rebellious towns, spend their days holed up at home to avoid running into trouble with the Syrian authorities.

Read more
The Two-Way
8:22 am
Tue October 1, 2013

Who Are The Two Republicans Who Crossed Lines?

Rep. Charlie Dent, R-Pa.
Cliff Owen AP

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 9:48 am

The Senate's votes have been along party lines when it comes to the so-called shutdown showdown.

And it's been mostly the same story in the House.

Read more

Pages