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The Two-Way
11:27 am
Thu October 3, 2013

Tesla's Stock Gets Burned After Car Fire And Downgrading

A Tesla Model S at the 2013 North American International Auto Show in Detroit on Jan. 15.
Stan Honda AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 12:26 pm

High-flying billionaire Elon Musk's Tesla Motors has seen its shares skid the past couple days because they've been downgraded by analysts and because of a YouTube clip showing one of the all-electric luxury cars engulfed in flames earlier this week.

Just before noon ET, a share of Tesla was trading around $169.50 — down about 6.5 percent for the day and $25 (13 percent) below its 52-week high of $194.50.

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The Salt
11:22 am
Thu October 3, 2013

How's The Sausage Made? These Folks Really Want To Share The Knowledge

Brent Gentry of Underground Meats rotates a coppa. Underground Meats is behind a new project that aims to lower the barrier to entry for would-be artisanal meat producers by making it easier for them to craft food safety plans.
Emily Julka Courtesy of Underground Meats

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 12:45 pm

With the current bloom of artisanal small-batch producers across the country, you'd think that all you need to start up a new food business is a good idea and a lot of gumption. And for the most part, that's true. But when it comes to artisanal producers working with meat, you also need something else: a Hazards Analysis and Critical Control Points plan. Or, if you will, a HACCP.

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The Government Shutdown
10:48 am
Thu October 3, 2013

Without Key Jobs Data, Markets And Economists Left Guessing

JPMorgan Chase trader Frederick Reimer works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. The government's monthly jobs numbers won't be released as scheduled Friday, leaving financial markets without key data to evaluate the economy.
Brendan McDermid Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 12:32 pm

Stock investors and business journalists unite each month for one shared, suspenseful moment — the 8:30 a.m. release of the Labor Department's employment report.

The unveiling of the report — so rich with data on job creation, unemployment, wages and hours — can be counted upon to set off a tsunami of tweets. Economists jump in with instant analysis and politicians fire off press releases with reactions.

That market-moving report was due this Friday.

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Environment
10:46 am
Thu October 3, 2013

Tropical Storm Karen Heading For U.S. Gulf Coast

The storm track forecast for Karen.
National Hurricane Center, Miami

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 1:07 pm

Newly formed Tropical Storm Karen, which could reach hurricane strength by Friday, is expected to make landfall on the U.S. Gulf Coast sometime over the weekend.

The National Hurricane Center in Miami says the late-season storm formed Thursday morning about 485 miles south of the Mississippi Delta, with maximum sustained winds of 65 mph. It was moving north-northwest at 12 mph, but was expected to speed up.

Forecasters say it will make landfall in the U.S. either Saturday or Sunday.

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NPR Story
10:43 am
Thu October 3, 2013

A Global 'Soul Quest' With Jazz Artist Keiko Matsui

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 2:05 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now a conversation with a celebrated jazz artist. This year, she is celebrating 25 years of recording in the United States. Along the way, she's worked with major stars like Stevie Wonder, Miles Davis and Hugh Masekela. Her accessible sound resonates with audiences all over the world. We're talking about the pianist and composer Keiko Matsui.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "STINGO")

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NPR Story
10:43 am
Thu October 3, 2013

A Second Golden Age Of TV?

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 2:05 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. In a few minutes, we'll speak with jazz artist Keiko Matsui. We'll talk about her new album "Soul Quest," and we'll hear about her efforts to help out after the tsunami in Japan. That's later.

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NPR Story
10:43 am
Thu October 3, 2013

Rick Najera: A Latino In Hollywood Is 'Almost White'

Omar 'Yogi' Torres Courtesy of Shabazz Communications, Inc.

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 9:32 am

Rick Najera doesn't remember his wife Susie dialing 9-1-1. She came home six hours after Najera had taken a fall that left him bleeding on the floor of his home. The Hollywood actor/writer/producer had pneumonia and ended up in an intensive care unit in a coma.

Rick Najera told NPR's Michel Martin that his near-death experience caused him to reflect.

"I really looked at my life and I said I wanted to chronicle it. I wanted to bring it down and talk about it in a very human, honest way," he says.

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The Two-Way
10:12 am
Thu October 3, 2013

How Do You Get Paid $400,000 At Carnegie Hall? Be A Stagehand

In November 2004, the Grand Ole Opry came to Carnegie Hall.
Paul Hawthorne Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 12:04 pm

(Update at 1 p.m. ET, Oct. 4: Click here for an important development — management and the stagehands have reached a deal.)

Our original post:

Carnegie Hall's opening night gala was canceled Wednesday because of a strike by stagehands.

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The Two-Way
10:09 am
Thu October 3, 2013

Treasury: New Debt Ceiling Fight Could Derail Economy

Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew leaves the Capitol after a visit on Thursday.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 2:30 pm

The Treasury Department is issuing a warning of dire economic consequences that could rival the Great Recession if Congress is unable to agree on raising the debt ceiling and the nation defaults on its obligations.

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The Two-Way
8:07 am
Thu October 3, 2013

Jobless Claims Stay Near Six-Year Low

There were 308,000 first-time claims for unemployment insurance filed last week, up 1,000 from the week before, the Employment and Training Administration reported Thursday morning.

That means claims continue to run at a relatively low rate that until recent weeks hadn't been seen since the spring of 2007 — six months before the start of the 2007-09 recession.

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