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The Salt
4:17 pm
Tue September 24, 2013

Global Love Of Bananas May Be Hurting Costa Rica's Crocodiles

A Costa Rican banana worker carries a stalk of freshly harvested fruit on a plantation in Costa Rica, where many of the bananas that Americans eat are grown.
Kent Gilbert AP

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 1:22 pm

Americans love bananas. Each year, we eat more bananas than any other fruit. But banana growers use a lot of pesticides — and those chemicals could be hurting wildlife. As a new study shows, the pesticides are ending up in the bodies of crocodiles living near banana farms in Costa Rica, where many of the bananas we eat are grown.

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The Two-Way
4:00 pm
Tue September 24, 2013

Jailed Massey Mine Boss Claims He Was Company's Sacrificial Lamb

A jailed, former superintendent of Massey Energy's Upper Big Branch coal mine claims his attorney colluded with attorneys for the company and its executives to avoid testimony about complicity in his crimes.

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All Tech Considered
3:52 pm
Tue September 24, 2013

The Mystery Of $600 Million Traded In The Blink Of An Eye

A television monitor on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange shows the decision the Federal Reserve made on Sept. 18, 2013.
Richard Drew AP

Here's a mystery involving physics, technology and the markets that meant the difference between nothing and millions of dollars.

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The Two-Way
3:46 pm
Tue September 24, 2013

Airbus Forecast: Asia-Pacific Air Traffic Set For Takeoff

Airbus hopes the global growth in air traffic will fuel demand for its giant A380.
Eric Feferberg AFP/Getty Images

There will be more passenger flights in the Asia-Pacific than anywhere else in the world in the next 20 years, with the region accounting for a third of all new commercial aircraft orders, according to Airbus's latest Global Market Forecast.

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The Two-Way
2:58 pm
Tue September 24, 2013

Golden Eagle Attacks Deer, A Photo Of An Epic Confrontation

A camera trap captures a golden eagle attacking a young sika deer at Lazovskii State Nature Reserve in the southern Russian Far East on Dec. 1, 2011.
Dr. Linda Kerley via WCS

Originally published on Wed September 25, 2013 10:06 am

For decades, circumstantial evidence has shown that golden eagles do indeed attack large mammals like deer and even bear cubs.

But in a paper published Monday in the Journal of Raptor Research, Linda Kerley of the Zoological Society of London and Jonathan Slaght of the Wildlife Conservation Society unveiled stunning images of an adult golden eagle attacking and killing a young sika deer, weighing 88 to 100 pounds.

The images were captured by a camera trap the researchers set up to study Siberian tigers in the Russian Far East.

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Parallels
1:56 pm
Tue September 24, 2013

Brazilian President Lashes Out Over U.S. Spying

Not Happy: Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff addresses the 68th U.N. General Assembly in New York on Tuesday.
Shannon Stapleton Reuters/Landov

President Dilma Rousseff of Brazil was so angry about reports that the National Security Agency was spying on her and others in her country that she recently called off a high-profile visit to the U.S.

The Brazilian leader was still in a fighting mood Tuesday as she used her speech at the United Nations General Assembly to deliver a broadside against U.S. spying. She also called for civilian oversight of the Web to ensure the protection of data.

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Shots - Health News
1:47 pm
Tue September 24, 2013

Lose Weight Before Trying Other Sleep Apnea Treatments

CPAP masks have become much more comfortable than in years past, doctors say. But most of the time, they're probably not the first thing to try for sleep apnea.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue September 24, 2013 3:06 pm

So your snoring is driving your partner crazy. Does that mean you're destined for one of those awkward-looking sleep apnea masks?

Not so fast, doctors say. Many snorers don't have sleep apnea, which causes a person to frequently stop breathing for brief periods during sleep. It's a big cause of chronic sleepiness and has been linked to a variety of health problems. Sleep apnea can also make a sufferer miserable.

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The Two-Way
1:06 pm
Tue September 24, 2013

NCAA Lifts Some Of The Sanctions Imposed On Penn State

Penn State football players run onto the field earlier this month in State College, Pa.
Gene J. Puskar AP

Originally published on Tue September 24, 2013 4:18 pm

Citing what it says has been "Penn State's continued progress toward ensuring athletics integrity," the NCAA said Tuesday that it is gradually restoring the football scholarships the school lost in the aftermath of the child sex abuse scandal involving former assistant coach Jerry Sandusky.

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The Protojournalist
12:07 pm
Tue September 24, 2013

Why Are Most Rampage Shooters Men?

A makeshift memorial hangs on a lamp post across the street from the Washington Navy Yard, on Sept. 20.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Tue September 24, 2013 1:29 pm

Aaron Alexis, the man who police say killed more than a dozen people at the Washington Navy Yard on Sept. 16, has joined a heinous parade of mass murdering shooters, nearly all men.

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The Two-Way
11:57 am
Tue September 24, 2013

Carnival's Earnings Hit By String Of Cruise Ship Problems

Part of the previously submerged, severely damaged right side of the Costa Concordia cruise ship is seen in an upright position last week after it was righted by salvage crews in Isola del Giglio, Italy.
Marco Secchi Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 24, 2013 2:18 pm

Miami-based Carnival Corp., the world's largest cruise operator, reported a third quarter profit nearly a third lower than a year ago following a series of embarrassing and deadly mishaps involving its ships.

Carnival turned a $934 million profit for the period June through August, down 30 percent from the same quarter in 2012.

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