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The Two-Way
12:05 pm
Sun June 9, 2013

Bush-Era NSA Chief Defends PRISM, Phone Metadata Collection

Retired Gen. Michael Hayden, former CIA and National Security Agency director, in a 2012 photo.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 12:58 pm

Gen. Michael Hayden, a former director of the National Security Agency, tells NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday that the government's acquisition of phone records and surveillance of Internet activity is lawful and justified by the changing nature of the war on terrorism.

Hayden, who served as NSA chief from 1999-2005 and is also a former CIA director, says NSA's activities are "perfectly legal" and "an accurate reflection of balancing our security and our privacy."

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Deceptive Cadence
11:26 am
Sun June 9, 2013

David Finckel On The Emerson Quartet's Changing Of The Guard

David Finckel is a longtime member of the Emerson String Quartet. Journeys: Tchaikovsky, Schoenberg is his last recording with the group.
Christian Steiner Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 11:09 am

The Emerson String Quartet is one of the most acclaimed chamber groups in the world of classical music. Since their founding in 1976, the group has won nine Grammys for its recordings. Now, it has a new album out called Journeys: Tchaikovsky, Schoenberg — and it's the last recording with cellist David Finckel, one of the quartet's longtime members.

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The Two-Way
10:19 am
Sun June 9, 2013

Family Strife Could Prove Motive In Santa Monica Shootings

This photo provided by the Santa Monica Police Department during a news conference Saturday shows a frame grab from a surveillance camera revealing the suspect entering Santa Monica College on Friday.
Ringo H.W. Chiu Associated Press

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 6:59 pm

Investigators were reportedly looking into family connections in their search for a motive in Friday's shooting rampage in Santa Monica, Calif., that left six people dead, including the gunman and a woman who died Sunday from injuries sustained in the assault.

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The Two-Way
9:30 am
Sun June 9, 2013

Delegations From Rival Koreas Meet At Panmunjom

South Korea's delegate (left) shakes hands with North Korea's head of working-level delegation Kim Song-Hye as she crosses the military demarcation line for the meeting at border village of Panmunjom.
Handout Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 1:41 pm

For the first time in two years, delegations from North and South Korea sat down for talks aimed at ratcheting down escalating tensions on the peninsula.

The meeting took place at the symbolically significant border village of Panmunjom, where nearly 60 years ago the two sides signed an armistice ending the Korean War.

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The Two-Way
8:45 am
Sun June 9, 2013

Chinese Cyber-Hacking Discussed At Obama-Xi Summit

President Obama and Chinese President Xi Jinping take a walk at the Annenberg Retreat at Sunnylands in Rancho Mirage, Calif., on Saturday.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 1:31 pm

A two-day summit between President Obama and his Chinese counterpart, Xi Jinping, is being described as a "unique, positive and constructive" meeting that reportedly produced broad agreement on handling North Korea and put the thorny issue of cybersecurity at the forefront.

It was hoped the summit, which wrapped up Saturday in California, would be an opportunity for the two men to establish a personal relationship weeks after Xi assumed the presidency in China.

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The Two-Way
7:42 am
Sun June 9, 2013

The Latest On The NSA Surveillance Story

British Foreign Secretary William Hague.
Abbas Momani AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 12:51 pm

In the past several days, there's been a steady flow of leaks about the National Security Agency and its secret surveillance activities, including the gathering of metadata on domestic and foreign telephone calls and the existence of PRISM, described in media reports as a top-secret data-mining program.

New developments are occurring on a daily basis. Here are a few we're watching right now:

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Monkey See
6:03 am
Sun June 9, 2013

When Your Data Is Currency, What Does Your Privacy Cost?

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 9:59 am

There was considerable mouth-dropping from publications such as The New York Times at initial reports this week that NSA programs are gathering both telephone records and information gleaned from large tech companies like Google and Microsoft. But as those reports have settled in, reactions have gotten more complex.

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The Salt
6:03 am
Sun June 9, 2013

An Abstract Look At The Food We Eat

Courtesy of Ajay Malghan

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 9:42 am

When photographer Ajay Malghan looks at this image, he sees the Virgin Mary. But you might see something entirely different — a flower petal, maybe. Or a sea slug.

Or how about ... a carrot? Yes, ladies and gentlemen, that is a picture of a sliced carrot.

And this? It's not a supernova. It's not the Eye of Sauron. It's a strawberry.

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The Sunday Conversation
5:50 am
Sun June 9, 2013

Making The Switch: An American Woman's Journey To Islam

Karen Danielson, who was raised Catholic, converted to Islam 30 years ago.
Courtesy of the Muslim American Society Chicago

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 1:35 pm

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Karen Danielson converted to Islam three decades ago, was she was 19. She was raised Catholic, and then later became a Baptist and enrolled in a Baptist college, where she picked up the Koran. Now, she's the director of outreach at the Chicago chapter of the Muslim American Society.

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Parallels
5:50 am
Sun June 9, 2013

In Colombia, A Town Badly Scarred By Wartime Rape

Isabel Narvaez, in El Placer, says she is still traumatized by the rape she suffered. The small hamlet in Colombia is just one place where women were victims of violent crimes during the civil conflict.
Paul Smith for NPR

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 4:08 pm

El Placer is a remote hamlet deep in southern Colombia, on the edge of the Amazon. Founded half a century ago by farmers who found it fertile and bucolic, its name means "The Pleasure."

But for women and girls in El Placer who suffered years of sexual assaults after an illegal armed group stormed in, the name is only associated with unspeakable violence and murder.

Brigitte Carreño, 25, is among the women who suffered. A feared local warlord in El Placer raped her when she was 12, leaving her with searing memories that remain vivid and painful to this day.

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