NPR News

Pages

The Two-Way
11:57 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Dick Van Dyke Can Still Laugh After His Car Burns To A Crisp

Dick Van Dyke's car after the fire. He's willing to sell it.
@iammrvandy

We're glad to report that 87-year-old comic actor Dick Van Dyke is alive and well after some scary moments Monday on a Los Angeles freeway.

We're also glad to be able to say that he's still got his sense of humor.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:50 am
Tue August 20, 2013

New Leak Reported At Japan's Fukushima Nuclear Plant

A construction worker walks beside underground water tanks at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in Japan.
Toshifumi Kitamura AP

Operators are reporting a fresh leak of contaminated water from the grounds of the ruined Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on Japan's coast.

In 2011, a tsunami sparked meltdowns at the plant, and authorities have had to pump in water ever since to keep the melted nuclear fuel cool. After passing through the reactors, the contaminated water is decontaminated and put into storage until it can be recirculated through the reactor cores.

Read more
NPR Story
11:03 am
Tue August 20, 2013

From Cuba To America, Arturo Sandoval Is An Ambassador For Jazz

Arturo Sandoval and Dizzy Gillespie perform.
Concord Music Group

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 3:17 pm

Cuban-born trumpeter Arturo Sandoval is set to receive the Presidential Medal of Freedom later this year for his contributions to the world of music. He's won nine Grammy awards and an Emmy. He's also collaborated with legends like Frank Sinatra and Johnny Mathis, and contemporary stars such as Justin Timberlake and Alicia Keys.

Read more
NPR Story
11:03 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Is It Time To Get Rid of IQ Tests In Schools?

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 11:06 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. And it's time for our weekly parenting roundtable. Every week we check in with a diverse group of parents to get a little common sense and some savvy advice. Today, we're talking about labeling school children according to their abilities, their strengths and their weaknesses. Schools have long used IQ tests and standardized tests of many varieties to group kids and teach each kid according to his or her abilities.

Read more
NPR Story
11:03 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Unrest Boiling Over In Egypt

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 11:06 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

I'm Celeste Headlee and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, Cuban jazz legend Arturo Sandoval joins us for a wisdom watch conversation. He'll tell us about his life in music and his special friendship with Dizzy Gillespie.

Read more
The Salt
10:59 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Ramen To The Rescue: How Instant Noodles Fight Global Hunger

A child eats instant noodles on a train at the Harbin Railway Station in northeast China.
Wang Jianwei Xinhua /Landov

Originally published on Fri August 23, 2013 2:25 pm

Ask about the foods that have conquered the world and you're likely to hear about Coca-Cola and McDonald's Big Macs.

Read more
Parallels
10:52 am
Tue August 20, 2013

60-Second Video: Syrian Refugees Escape To Lebanon

Global Post

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 1:47 pm

Nearly 2 million Syrians are refugees in other countries because of the civil war in their country. Many of them — nearly 700,000, according to the U.N. — are now in Lebanese camps.

Our partners at Global Post have captured how some Syrians enter Turkey and then make their way by boat to Lebanon.

Read more
Parallels
10:49 am
Tue August 20, 2013

CIA's Acknowledgment Of Iran Coup Role Is Latest Revelation

Iranian Prime Minister Mohammad Mossadegh in October 1951. The CIA this week acknowledged publicly for the first time that it played a role in the coup that ousted Mossadegh.
AP

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 11:45 am

The CIA isn't exactly known for its openness. But for a spy agency, it's been a gusher of information over the past week when it comes to old controversies.

The CIA has now acknowledged its role in the 1953 coup that deposed Iran's left-leaning Prime Minister Mohammad Mosaddegh. Few Iranians will be surprised. They have always believed Mosaddegh was ousted by U.S. and British interests, and those suspicions are a big part of Iran's mistrust of the West to this day.

The Iran revelation was not the only one.

Read more
Code Switch
10:29 am
Tue August 20, 2013

The Dream 9 Pushes The Envelope (And Their Allies' Buttons)

The immigration activists known as the Dream 9 were arrested after attempting to re-enter the United States.
Samantha Sais AP

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 3:11 pm

The national conversation around immigration has shifted dramatically over the past decade. That's in large part because of activists who have pushed to change the narrative around the undocumented.

Read more
It's All Politics
10:05 am
Tue August 20, 2013

Obama's College-Cost Tour Is A Chance To Get Past Climbing Walls

The climbing wall at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. Such amenities have been cited as evidence of wasteful spending on college campuses.
AP

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 11:34 am

President Obama, back from his vacation, is scheduled to address the college affordability crisis in a campaign-style bus tour that will take him to New York and Pennsylvania.

The tour, which takes place Thursday and Friday, is part of the president's overarching effort to highlight his agenda for middle-class Americans and to raise pressure on congressional Republicans to act on his second-term priorities.

Read more

Pages