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The Two-Way
3:02 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

Supreme Court Rules For Adoptive Family In Dispute

This October 2011 photo provided by Melanie Capobianco shows her adoptive daughter, Veronica, trick-or-treating in Charleston, S.C. The Supreme Court handed down a decision Tuesday in favor of the Capobiancos, who sued after Veronica was returned to her biological father under the Indian Child Welfare Act.
Courtesy of Melanie Capobianco AP

In a complex and heart-wrenching case, a divided Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that the parental rights of a Native American father may be terminated if he has failed to establish a history of "continued custody" of his biological child.

The decision in Adoptive Couple v. Baby Girl, however, is viewed as narrow and leaves intact the the 1978 federal law known as the Indian Child Welfare Act. The law was designed to stop the historically brutal and improper removal of Native American children from their families for adoption or foster care by white parents.

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NPR Story
2:37 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

'Let The Fire Burn': A Philadelphia Community Forever Changed

Throughout the '70s and '80s, the radical African-American MOVE organization had several dramatic encounters with police.
Courtesy of Amigo Media

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 1:05 pm

On May 13, 1985, after a long standoff, Philadelphia municipal authorities dropped a bomb on a residential row house. The Osage Avenue home was the headquarters of the African-American radical group MOVE, which had confronted police on many occasions since the group's founding in 1972.

The resulting fire killed 11 people — including five children and the group's leader, John Africa — destroyed 61 homes, and tore apart a community.

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Law
1:56 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

What Changes After Supreme Court Ruling On Voting Rights Act

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 4:19 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. This morning in a much anticipated decision, the Supreme Court struck down a key provision of the 1965 Voting Rights Act. Writing for a five-four majority, Chief Justice John Roberts ruled that Congress' action to protect minority voting rights in nine states was based on outdated data, and the formula used to determine which areas were subject to federal oversight was thus unconstitutional.

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Middle East
1:56 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

Saudi Arabia Solidifies Support Of Syrian Opposition

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

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Medical Treatments
1:56 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

Surgeons Nuland And Gawande Look To The Future Of Medicine

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Of the many programs we've aired over the years on medicine, none has been more interesting than the series of conversations with Sherwin Nuland and Atul Gawande, both surgeons and teachers. Both have also gone public as writers on their profession both to inform the public about what they do and why and how it's changing and to speak with their colleagues about what works and what doesn't.

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The Two-Way
12:41 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

Cardboard Bike's Fundraiser Is Rolling

The cardboard bicycle.
Baz Ratner Reuters /Landov

A quick update for the many who seemed fascinated by Israeli inventor Izhar Gafni's cardboard bicycle and his bid to bring it to the world:

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The Two-Way
12:04 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

Germany Says It's Uncovered Terrorist Plot Using Model Planes

German officials say they've uncovered a radical Islamist plot to use remote-controlled model airplanes packed with explosives to carry out terrorist attacks in Germany.

Police carried out nine predawn raids in southern and eastern Germany as well as Belgium in search of evidence of what prosecutors allege was a plan for a "serious, state-threatening act of violence." There were no arrests.

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The Two-Way
11:30 am
Tue June 25, 2013

Putin: NSA Leaker Is A 'Free Person' At Moscow Airport

Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks at the presidential summer residence Kultaranta in Naantali, Finland on Tuesday.
Kimmo Mantyla AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 4:53 pm

Russian President Vladimir Putin appeared to rebuff the United States when he said NSA leaker Edward Snowden was in Moscow but is a "free person" who is "entitled to buy a ticket and fly to wherever he wants."

Snowden, Putin said, is in the transit zone of Moscow's Sheremetyevo Airport and has neither crossed the Russian border nor "committed any crime" on Russian soil.

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The Two-Way
11:29 am
Tue June 25, 2013

'Victory' For Landowners At The Supreme Court

Gary Cameron Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 2:12 pm

While the Supreme Court decision knocking down a key provision of the 1965 Voting Rights Act is getting a lot of attention Tuesday, there's another ruling that's going to be of high interest to property owners across the nation.

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Intelligence Squared U.S.
11:24 am
Tue June 25, 2013

Is Cutting The Pentagon's Budget A Gift To Our Enemies?

Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 12:48 pm

  • Listen To The Full Audio Of The Debate
  • Listen To The Broadcast Version Of The Debate

Amid the across-the-board budget cuts known as sequestration and a general belt-tightening mood among many on Capitol Hill, the Pentagon is being asked to reduce its spending after a decade of increases.

Some argue that even with cutbacks, the U.S. spends far more than other countries on defense, and that the drones and special operations forces increasingly being used in the counterterrorism fight cost less than conventional military operations.

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