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With its large sand dunes, rivers, big lakes and seas, Saturn's biggest moon is one of the most Earth-like planetary bodies in the solar system. But Titan is no place to call home.

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It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

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Let's go now to David Greene who's in Miami, just back from a week reporting in Cuba. It's a hard place to get in, and he's been looking into the changes and reforms that are being put into play in what has been a largely closed Communist state for decades now. David, welcome back, and tell us what we'll be learning from your reporting in the coming days.

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Two journalists in Cairo got seven years in prison and third received 10 years. Egypt's government accused them of helping the banned Muslim Brotherhood.

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You know, I was driving with the windows down on Sunday afternoon and suddenly heard roaring crowds cheering and chanting U.S.A.. It was a lovely summer day here in Washington, D.C., and the car rolled between two outdoor restaurants where people watching the World Cup on TV saw the U.S. score a goal to go ahead. In the end, the U.S. only tied Portugal 2 to 2. They were playing in the city of Manaus, in the thick heat and humidity of the Brazilian Amazon. NPR's Tom Goldman was there.

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In the stuffy, little gymnasium at Richard Kluge Elementary in Milwaukee, 16 boys and girls are stretching, jumping and marching to music.

Two years ago, the school had no gym, art or music classes due to budget cuts. But now, Kluge students get a so-called "special" class three days a week.

FIFA, the governing body of the World Cup, says it has zero tolerance for racist and homophobic conduct by players and fans at this year's international soccer event.

Late last week, FIFA opened an investigation into the display of neo-Nazi banners by both Russian and Croat fans at the World Cup. And Brazil and Mexico face possible sanctions for chanting a homophobic slur during their match last week. But soccer fans say the world is misinterpreting the use of the word and their team spirit.

The auto industry is cruising toward a record number of safety recalls: GM has recalled 20 million vehicles in the first six months of this year, and most carmakers have lowered the bar for the kind of problems that'll have them sending you back to your local dealers.

But while that sounds like bad news, it turns out that recalls can have an upside — at least for car dealers.

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