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The Two-Way
2:33 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Former Sen. Larry Craig Argues His Bathroom Antics Were Part Of His Work

Former Sen. Larry Craig, a Republican from Idaho.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 5:40 am

Lawyers for former Sen. Larry Craig argued today that using campaign money for a legal defense over his 2007 arrest was proper because he was arrested while on official business.

If you recall, Craig, a Republican from Idaho, was arrested during a sting at the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport. Craig used a bathroom there during a layover, when an undercover officer said Craig sexually solicited him by tapping his foot.

Craig pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor but after his case became public he tried to renege.

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The Two-Way
2:13 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

VIDEO: Helmet-cam Records Mountain Climber's Wild Slide; He's OK

Mark Roberts' feet, in the foreground, as he slid down a mountain in Wales.
British Mountaineering Council

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 8:36 pm

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The Two-Way
1:32 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

In Noma's Norovirus Episode, Ignored Emails Get Some Blame

The facade of Noma in Copenhagen. More than 60 diners complained of nausea and diarrhea after eating at the widely acclaimed restaurant last month.
Dresling Jens AP

Days after news spread that Danish restaurant Noma, three-time winner of Restaurant magazine's "World's Best Restaurant" title, was blamed for a norovirus outbreak in which dozens of diners fell ill, the restaurant has issued a public response and sought to clarify its handling of the situation.

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The Opinion Page
1:12 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Op-Ed: We Need More Aaron Swartz-Style Hacktivism

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 2:58 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan.

And now the Opinion Page. The release of millions of academic papers by Internet activist Aaron Swartz raised many questions about how much access the public should have to scholarship, questions that took on new dimensions after his suicide. At the time of his death, Swartz faced federal charges of wire fraud and violations of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act.

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Asia
1:07 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Japan's Broken Coast Struggles To Recover

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 2:53 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

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Digital Life
1:01 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

The 'Nasty Effect': How Comments Color Comprehension

Researchers found that exposure to uncivil comments can polarize opinion on news issues.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 4:56 pm

At its best, the Web is a place for unlimited exchange of ideas. But Web-savvy news junkies have known for a long time that reader feedback can often turn nasty. Now a study in the Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication suggests that rude comments on articles can even change the way we interpret the news.

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All Tech Considered
12:54 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

May You Tweet In Peace: Social Media Beyond The Grave

iStockphoto.com

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The Two-Way
12:46 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Update: Falkland Islands Voters Opt To Stay With Britain

Residents gather in Stanley, Falkland Islands on Monday, during a referendum intended to show the world that they want to stay British amid increasingly tense relations with Argentina.
Tony Chater AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 7:38 am

Update at 8:35 a.m. ET, March 12. Nearly Unanimous:

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The Two-Way
11:34 am
Mon March 11, 2013

Tibetan Customs Include Horse Races ... And Paramilitary Police?

A close look at a photo of the Nagqu horse festival in northern Tibet at the National Museum of China in Beijing reveals a gaggle of surprising "spectators" at the traditional Tibetan event: Chinese paramilitary police (see enlargement).
Louisa Lim NPR

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 12:09 pm

In the exiled Tibetan calendar, March 10 is an emotive day, the anniversary of a failed uprising in 1959.

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The Two-Way
11:21 am
Mon March 11, 2013

International Convention Moves To Limit Shark 'Finning' Trade

Indonesian fishermen unload their catch, including sharks and baby sharks, in Lampulo fish market in Banda Aceh last week.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 1:33 pm

Delegates to an international species conservation conference in Bangkok, Thailand, this week have agreed to limit the trade of shark fins and meat.

NPR's Christopher Joyce reports that government representatives to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species, or CITES, have agreed to put the porbeagle, oceanic whitetip, three kinds of hammerhead shark and two kinds of manta ray on its Appendix II list, which places restrictions on fishing but still allows limited trade.

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