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The Two-Way
11:11 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Man Who Set Fire To Navy Submarine Sentenced To 17 Years

The Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Miami (SSN 755) enters a dry dock to begin an engineered overhaul at Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in Maine.
Jim Cleveland U.S. Navy

Casey Fury, the civilian employee who set fire to the USS Miami nuclear-powered attack submarine in Maine was sentenced to 17 years in prison, today.

Fury pleaded guilty to two counts of arson, one for the Miami fire, the other for a fire he set weeks later.

Sea Coast Online reports:

"'From the bottom of my heart, I'm truly sorry,' Fury said during his sentencing hearing. 'I can't put into words the remorse I feel. I had no intention of hurting anyone.'"

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NPR Story
10:41 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Curiosity Hits Paydirt: New Clues To Life On Mars

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 12:03 pm

Microbes may once have happily existed on the surface of Mars, according to chemical analysis of a sedimentary rock in the Red Planet's Gale crater. NASA geologist and exobiologist David Blake discusses evidence for an ancient freshwater lake in the crater, and describes the mineral-chomping microbes that may have thrived there.

NPR Story
10:41 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Improving Healthcare, One Search At A Time

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 12:03 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY; I'm Ira Flatow. We've all been there, sitting at the computer late at night, clicking on those websites that offer medical opinions, trying to convince ourselves that our headache must be caused by a brain tumor, right? Yeah, that dry skin you've had for the last couple of months, of course it's due to a thyroid disorder because that's what you're finding out on the Web. Recognize yourself?

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NPR Story
10:41 am
Fri March 15, 2013

'Bones' Inspires A New Generation Of Crime Fighters

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 12:03 pm

Kathy Reichs, the writer and scientist behind the TV show Bones, is back with a new novel for young adults. Code: A Virals Novel stars Tory Brennan, great-niece of Reich's famed crime-solving heroine Tempe Brennan. Reichs discusses the book, co-written with Brendan Reichs.

The Two-Way
10:33 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Construction Crews May Have Found 'Black Plague' Victims In Britain

Archaeologists examine skeletons thought to be from the 14th century that were discovered in an excavation belonging to British rail company, Crossrail.
Crossrail

What can you find underneath a British railroad or parking lot? These days it could be skeletons, and probably a lot of them. Last month, researchers announced the bones of a man discovered underneath a British parking lot were actually King Richard III. Today, a British rail project says some of its staff stumbled upon skeletons of people who may have died of the Black Death nearly 700 years ago, during an outbreak of bubonic plague.

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The Two-Way
10:19 am
Fri March 15, 2013

CDC Confirms 'Extremely Rare' Death From Rabies Transmitted By Transplant

A Maryland man who died two weeks ago contracted rabies "through [an] organ transplantation done more than a year ago," the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed Friday morning.

The CDC adds that:

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NPR Story
10:16 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Will Pope Francis Answer Muslims' Prayers, Too?

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 3:15 pm

Host Michel Martin checks in with the Barbershop guys for a fresh cut on the week's news, including the new pope and college basketball's March Madness. Martin is joined by culture critic Jimi Izrael, attorney Arsalan Iftikhar, sports writer Pablo Torre and Reverend Leo Patalinghug.

NPR Story
10:16 am
Fri March 15, 2013

CPAC Goes To Washington: Can They Rally And Rebuild?

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 8:56 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, you might've been following the long debate over whether this country locks up too many people for too little reason and for too long. It turns out something else interesting is happening that you might not heard about - the racial breakdown of the prison population is changing. More white people, especially more white women, are getting locked up. And we'll find out more about that in a few minutes.

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NPR Story
10:16 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Do You Really Know Who's Behind Bars?

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 10:52 am

There's been a dramatic shift in the racial makeup of America's prison inmates, especially female inmates. To find out why, host Michel Martin talks with Sentencing Project Executive Director Marc Mauer, and author Patrice Gaines, who has worked with women in prison for more than 20 years. They say changes in drug crime enforcement, sentencing laws, and the economic downturn all played a role.

The Two-Way
9:17 am
Fri March 15, 2013

New Pope Praises Benedict, Asks Cardinals To Evangelize

Pope Francis as he visits the papal residence at the Vatican on Thursday.
Vatican AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 11:43 am

Pope Francis, in his first audience with the cardinals since becoming head of the world's 1.2 billion Roman Catholics, praised his predecessor, Benedict XVI, and urged the evangelization of the church's message.

Francis said of Benedict, who served as pontiff for eight years before his historic resignation last month, that he "lit a flame in the depths of our hearts that will continue to burn because it is fueled by his prayers."

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