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It's All Politics
11:52 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Four Faces Of Conservatism: Possible Directions For The GOP

iStockphoto

Is it the message or its delivery?

That's one of the questions being debated as Republicans — like all parties that have lost a national election — plot their comeback.

Some think they need to take a new tack on issues such as immigration in order to appeal to changing times and demographic changes. Others believe that the GOP's core conservative principles are still political winners, if delivered in a more convincing manner than was the case during last year's presidential race.

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The Two-Way
11:43 am
Fri March 15, 2013

NHL Realignment: New Divisions Drawn To Ease Time Zone Conflicts

A chart depicts the NHL's new divisions, which will take effect when the new season begins later this year. The lineup puts 16 teams in the Eastern Conference, and 14 in the Western.
NHL

The NHL will shuffle its teams before next season, moving from three divisions in each conference to a total of four divisions in the Eastern and Western Conferences. The league's owners approved the plan Thursday; the players' association gave its OK last week.

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The Two-Way
11:27 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Court Says CIA Can't Have It Both Ways On Drones

Don't deny you have documents about drones, court tells the CIA.
Kirsty Wigglesworth AP

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 1:56 pm

A federal appeals court has rejected an effort by the CIA to deny it has any documents about a U.S. drone program that has killed terrorists overseas, ruling that the agency is stretching the law too far and asking judges "to give their imprimatur to a fiction of deniability that no reasonable person would regard as plausible."

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The Two-Way
11:11 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Man Who Set Fire To Navy Submarine Sentenced To 17 Years

The Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Miami (SSN 755) enters a dry dock to begin an engineered overhaul at Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in Maine.
Jim Cleveland U.S. Navy

Casey Fury, the civilian employee who set fire to the USS Miami nuclear-powered attack submarine in Maine was sentenced to 17 years in prison, today.

Fury pleaded guilty to two counts of arson, one for the Miami fire, the other for a fire he set weeks later.

Sea Coast Online reports:

"'From the bottom of my heart, I'm truly sorry,' Fury said during his sentencing hearing. 'I can't put into words the remorse I feel. I had no intention of hurting anyone.'"

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NPR Story
10:41 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Curiosity Hits Paydirt: New Clues To Life On Mars

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 12:03 pm

Microbes may once have happily existed on the surface of Mars, according to chemical analysis of a sedimentary rock in the Red Planet's Gale crater. NASA geologist and exobiologist David Blake discusses evidence for an ancient freshwater lake in the crater, and describes the mineral-chomping microbes that may have thrived there.

NPR Story
10:41 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Improving Healthcare, One Search At A Time

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 12:03 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY; I'm Ira Flatow. We've all been there, sitting at the computer late at night, clicking on those websites that offer medical opinions, trying to convince ourselves that our headache must be caused by a brain tumor, right? Yeah, that dry skin you've had for the last couple of months, of course it's due to a thyroid disorder because that's what you're finding out on the Web. Recognize yourself?

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NPR Story
10:41 am
Fri March 15, 2013

'Bones' Inspires A New Generation Of Crime Fighters

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 12:03 pm

Kathy Reichs, the writer and scientist behind the TV show Bones, is back with a new novel for young adults. Code: A Virals Novel stars Tory Brennan, great-niece of Reich's famed crime-solving heroine Tempe Brennan. Reichs discusses the book, co-written with Brendan Reichs.

The Two-Way
10:33 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Construction Crews May Have Found 'Black Plague' Victims In Britain

Archaeologists examine skeletons thought to be from the 14th century that were discovered in an excavation belonging to British rail company, Crossrail.
Crossrail

What can you find underneath a British railroad or parking lot? These days it could be skeletons, and probably a lot of them. Last month, researchers announced the bones of a man discovered underneath a British parking lot were actually King Richard III. Today, a British rail project says some of its staff stumbled upon skeletons of people who may have died of the Black Death nearly 700 years ago, during an outbreak of bubonic plague.

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The Two-Way
10:19 am
Fri March 15, 2013

CDC Confirms 'Extremely Rare' Death From Rabies Transmitted By Transplant

A Maryland man who died two weeks ago contracted rabies "through [an] organ transplantation done more than a year ago," the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed Friday morning.

The CDC adds that:

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NPR Story
10:16 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Will Pope Francis Answer Muslims' Prayers, Too?

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 3:15 pm

Host Michel Martin checks in with the Barbershop guys for a fresh cut on the week's news, including the new pope and college basketball's March Madness. Martin is joined by culture critic Jimi Izrael, attorney Arsalan Iftikhar, sports writer Pablo Torre and Reverend Leo Patalinghug.

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