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The Two-Way
3:16 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

House Votes To End Full-Fare Rule For Airline Tickets

A family checks in for an American Airlines flight at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 4:25 pm

The House voted Monday to allow airlines to advertise lower prices for their routes.

The Transparent Airfares Act, which was approved with minimal debate, would overturn a 2012 rule that requires airlines to post the full price of tickets, including taxes and fees.

Shoppers are smart enough to figure out the price of an airline ticket without federal regulation, said Oregon Democrat Peter DeFazio, a bill co-sponsor.

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Goats and Soda
3:07 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

Taliban In Pakistan Derail World Polio Eradication

A health worker gives a child the polio vaccine in Bannu, Pakistan, June 25. More than a quarter-million children in Taliban-controlled areas are likely to miss their immunizations.
A. Majeed AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 3:56 am

Last January Salma Jaffar was shot while she was going door to door in Karachi, giving children drops of the polio vaccine.

"Even when they took out the pistol, I couldn't understand why he was taking out the gun," Jaffar says of the two men who pulled up on a motorcycle and started shooting at the vaccination team.

"But when he opened fire, that is when I thought it was the end of the life," she says. "My first thought was that I won't be able to see my children again."

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NPR Ed
3:03 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

Teacher Tenure Lawsuits Spread From California To New York

Campbell Brown of the Partnership for Educational Justice, with plaintiffs in their New York teacher tenure lawsuit.
Gwynne Hogan WNYC

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 6:40 pm

Why are so many low-income and minority kids getting second-class educations in the U.S.?

That question is at the center of the heated debate about teacher tenure. In New York today, a group of parents and advocates, led by former CNN and NBC anchor Campbell Brown, filed a suit challenging state laws that govern when teachers can be given tenure and how they can be fired once they have it.

As WNYC reported, Brown announced the suit on the steps of City Hall:

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The Two-Way
3:02 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

Another Appeals Court Tosses Same-Sex-Marriage Ban

Plantiffs in the suit over Virginia's ban on gay marriage, Emily Schall-Townley (from left), Carol Schall and Mary Townley, after a hearing on May 13.
Steve Helber AP

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 5:34 pm

For the second time this summer, a federal appellate court has voted to strike down a ban on same-sex marriage.

A panel of the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Monday upheld a district court judge's decision that Virginia's ban on same-sex marriage is unconstitutional.

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Shots - Health News
2:43 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

Medicare's Costs Stabilize, But Its Problems Are Far From Fixed

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 7:12 pm

Medicare's Hospital Insurance Trust Fund, which finances about half of the health program for seniors and the disabled, won't run out of money until 2030, the program's trustees said Monday. That's four years later than projected last year, and 13 years later than projected the year before the passage of the Affordable Care Act.

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The Two-Way
1:30 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

Margot Adler, An NPR Journalist For Three Decades, Dies

Margot Adler, seen here in 2006, was a longtime reporter for NPR. She died Monday following a battle with cancer.
Michael Paras NPR

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 4:24 am

Margot Adler, one of the signature voices on NPR's airwaves for more than three decades, died Monday at her home in New York City. She was 68 and had been battling cancer.

Margot joined the NPR staff as a general assignment reporter in 1979. She went on to cover everything from the beginnings of the AIDS epidemic to confrontations involving the Ku Klux Klan in Greensboro, N.C., to the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

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The Salt
1:27 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

Fast-Food Scandal Revives China's Food Safety Anxieties

A U.S. company that supplies meat to some fast-food chains in China has pulled all of its products, some of which were chicken nuggets sold in Hong Kong, made by a Chinese subsidiary.
Kin Cheung AP

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 6:39 pm

A U.S. company that supplies meat to some of the world's largest fast-food chains in China has pulled all its products made by a Chinese subsidiary, after reports that it was selling expired products.

The food safety scandal that erupted in China in the last week has also spread overseas, affecting chain restaurants in Japan and Hong Kong, and prompted calls for tighter food safety regulation in China.

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The Two-Way
1:25 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

FAA Seeks $12 Million Fine Against Southwest Airlines

A Boeing 737 jetliner operated by Southwest awaits loading at the Little Rock, Ark., airport.
Danny Johnston AP

The Federal Aviation Administration announced Monday that it intends to fine Southwest Airlines $12 million for flying Boeing 737 airplanes without making proper repairs.

Beginning in 2006, Southwest began "extreme makeover" alterations to address cracking of aluminum skin on 44 jetliners, the FAA said in a news release.

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The Two-Way
12:37 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

It May Be Summer, But For Economists, This Week Feels Like Christmas

Chiang Ying-ying AP

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 3:31 pm

This week is summer's sweet spot — the peak time for pool parties, fresh-picked berries and cool drinks. But for economists, it may feel more like Christmas — so much to unwrap!

Each day will bring new decisions and reports that could have a big impact on the nation's economy. So economists, investors and workers will have plenty to ponder. Here's what's happening this week:

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National Security
12:19 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

To Stop Cheating, Nuclear Officers Ditch The Grades

First Lt. Patrick Romanofski (center) and 2nd Lt. Andrew Beckner (left) practice the launch of nuclear weapons. Promotions are now more strongly influenced by hands-on performance in this simulator.
R.J. Oriez U.S. Air Force

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 6:40 pm

The young officers at F.E. Warren Air Force Base have an enormous job: to keep 150 nuclear-tipped missiles ready to launch at a moment's notice.

Understandably, they're expected to know exactly what they're doing.

Three times a month, they're tested on the weapons and the codes used to launch them. Anything less than 90 percent is a fail.

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