NPR News

Pages

Parallels
10:59 am
Tue May 6, 2014

Boko Haram's Local Fight Suddenly Gets International Scrutiny

A "wanted" poster for Boko Haram leader Abubakar Shekau in Baga village in northeastern Nigeria, the region where the radical Islamist group is based.
Tim Cocks Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 4:58 pm

The radical Islamist group Boko Haram isn't new. The group has been around for more than a decade and has waged a bloody insurgency in northeastern Nigeria for the past five years. But it has suddenly achieved international notoriety by kidnapping more than 200 schoolgirls who have now been missing for more than three weeks.

Read more
The Protojournalist
10:54 am
Tue May 6, 2014

The Lost Village In New York City

Central Park swept over Seneca Village.
istockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed May 7, 2014 8:49 am

Smack in the center of New York City — in the confines of Central Park — there are ghostly vestiges of a 19th century neighborhood that once was vibrant and thriving but now is largely forgotten: Seneca Village.

It is considered by historians to be one of Manhattan's earliest communities of African-American property owners.

Read more
Television
10:51 am
Tue May 6, 2014

Viewers Not Laughing About SNL Slavery Skit

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 12:38 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Finally today, we're switching gears now. You know that terrible feeling you get when you tell a joke that bombs? You think you're saying something hilarious or edgy or clever and crickets or gasps or worse, thousands of people lighting up Twitter to say just how unfunny or messed up you are.

Read more
Behind Closed Doors
10:51 am
Tue May 6, 2014

Advice Columnist Couldn't Reveal His Secret ... Until Now

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 12:38 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now we go behind closed doors. That's the part of the program where we talk about issues that people often keep private. Our guest today is used to dealing with sensitive issues. Steven Petrow is an advice and etiquette columnist who's just moved his column from the New York Times to the Washington Post.

Read more
Your Money
10:51 am
Tue May 6, 2014

Is Bitcoin Where The Smart Money Is Now?

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 12:38 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now we'd like to turn to matters of personal finance. It turns out that money is more than what you have in your pocket. Today we want to take a look at the digital currency known as bitcoin.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:04 am
Tue May 6, 2014

Bayer Will Buy Merck Consumer Unit For $14.2 Billion

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 4:44 pm

German drug company Bayer has agreed to acquire the consumer care business of U.S.-based Merck & Co., in a deal that would bolster Bayer in the over-the-counter drug sector. The $14.2 billion purchase includes brands such as Claritin, Coppertone and Dr. Scholl's.

From Reuters:

Read more
Shots - Health News
9:24 am
Tue May 6, 2014

Medicare Pays For Alzheimer's Screening, But Do You Want To Know?

The screening tests for dementia are simple, but the questions surrounding them are complex.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed May 7, 2014 8:37 am

Medicare will pay for screening for cognitive impairment, but that doesn't mean it's necessarily a good idea.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force said in March that there isn't enough scientific evidence to make the call.

That's the same conclusion that the task force, an independent panel of medical experts, came to more than a decade ago, when it last evaluated dementia screening. Patient advocates say the evidence is crystal clear in one respect: More research needs to be done.

Read more
The Two-Way
8:44 am
Tue May 6, 2014

Kidnappers In Nigeria Wore Uniforms, Escaped Girl Says

Muslim women march as part of a call for Nigeria's government to increase efforts to rescue more than 200 girls who were kidnapped from their school last month.
Sunday Alamba AP

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 10:38 am

The gunmen who abducted 276 girls from a school in Nigeria last month wore uniforms and said they were soldiers who had come to help, according to a girl who escaped her captors. The girls were led outside — and it wasn't until the gunmen stole food and set fire to the school that the girls became certain they were in trouble.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:55 am
Tue May 6, 2014

New Report Finds Climate Change Already Having Broad Impact

People survey the damage on Scenic Highway in Pensacola, Fla., after part of it collapsed following heavy rains and flash flooding on April 30.
Marianna Massey Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 10:22 am

A new U.S. government report released Tuesday finds that climate change is already having a broad impact on both weather and the economy.

NPR's Elizabeth Shogren tells our Newscast unit the third National Climate Assessment is the most comprehensive look at climate change that the government has ever produced. It was put together by more than 300 experts "guided by a 60-member Federal Advisory Committee."

She filed this report for our Newscast unit:

Read more
It's All Politics
7:39 am
Tue May 6, 2014

This Could Be The Year Iowa Sends Its First Woman To Congress

Iowa state Sen. Joni Ernst, shown during a recent debate with her GOP primary opponents, is attempting to become the first female Republican to win her party's nomination to run for U.S. Senate in the Hawkeye State.
Charlie Neibergall AP

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 12:55 pm

In its 168 years, Iowa has never elected a woman to Congress or picked one as its governor.

For many residents who pride themselves on a progressive civil rights history that predates statehood, that political reality has become an exasperating distinction shared with only one other state — Mississippi.

Read more

Pages