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The Two-Way
6:11 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

U.S. Troubled By Iran's Choice Of 1979 Hostage-Taker For U.N. Post

The U.S. says Iran's potential nomination of a new United Nations ambassador who was a hostage-taker during the 1979 takeover of the U.S. Embassy in Tehran is "extremely troubling," but stopped short of saying it would deny him a visa.

"We're taking a close look at the case now, and we've raised our serious concerns about this possible nomination with the government of Iran," State Department deputy spokesman Marie Harf said of Hamid Aboutalebi, who was a member of a radical Muslim student group who seized the took over the embassy and held 52 Americans hostage for 444 days.

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The Two-Way
5:53 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Shooting At Fort Hood Leaves 4 Dead, 16 Injured

Lucy Hamlin and her husband, Spc. Timothy Hamlin, wait for permission to re-enter the Fort Hood military post, following a shooting there Wednesday.
Tamir Kalifa AP

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 6:37 am

This post has news through 11:20 p.m. ET on Wednesday. For updates since then, click here.

A gunman opened fire on the military post of Fort Hood, Texas, on Wednesday, killing three and injuring 16, before putting the gun to his head and killing himself, Lt. Gen. Mark A. Milley said at a televised news conference.

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It's All Politics
5:36 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Campaign Finance Ruling Winners: The Political Pros

The Supreme Court victory for Republican activist Shaun McCutcheon (center) was also a win for those in the political campaign business.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 1:10 pm

The Supreme Court's McCutcheon decision has been described both as a victory for the First Amendment and as another damaging blow to campaign finance laws.

One thing seems certain: The decision, which overturned limits on the aggregate amounts individual donors can give to candidates and campaigns, will mean more money sloshing around political campaigns.

In practical terms, that means more business for the political consultants who orchestrate most serious federal political campaigns.

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The Salt
4:54 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Stop, Thief! When Colleagues Steal From The Office Fridge

"Too darn funny what a co-worker put on top of her lunch. It was fake of course, but got the point across."
Courtesy of Toni Kinnard

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 8:54 pm

As a wedding planner, Jeanne Hamilton saw her share of very bad manners — people who made her think, "There should be an etiquette hell for people like you."

And bingo! That was the beginning of her website, Etiquette Hell, a repository of more than 6,000 firsthand accounts of bad behavior people witness in their fellow peers.

And the most frequent complaint? Fridge theft. It's rampant, apparently, in offices all over the world.

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Business
4:53 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Traders Defend High-Speed Systems Against Charges Of Rigging

"The stock market is rigged," says Michael Lewis, and high-frequency traders are to blame. But defenders of high-speed trading say it plays a legitimate role.
Paul Giamou iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 8:54 pm

The FBI and the Securities and Exchange Commission revealed this week that they're both investigating the world of high-frequency stock trading. They did so at a time when a new book on the subject, Flash Boys by Michael Lewis, is causing an uproar on Wall Street.

To read Lewis' book is to be reminded of how drastically the stock market has changed in a decade — and how opaque it remains. Lewis says this opacity serves to cover up some disturbing developments.

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The Two-Way
4:00 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Yanukovych: 'I Was Wrong' To Ask Russian Troops Into Crimea

Ousted Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych during an interview with The Associated Press, in Rostov-on-Don, Russia, on Wednesday. He said he hoped to persuade Russian President Vladimir Putin to return Crimea to Ukraine.
Ivan Sekretarev AP

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 10:20 am

Former Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych, who was ousted after asking Russian troops into Crimea, admits that his decision was wrong, calling Moscow's annexation of the Black Sea peninsula "a major tragedy."

In an interview with The Associated Press and Russian channel NTV, he said he made a mistake when he asked Russia to intervene, a move many Ukrainians view as treason.

"I was wrong," he said through a translator. "I acted on my emotions."

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Law
3:16 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Enforcing Prison Rape Elimination Standards Proves Tricky

The Prison Rape Elimination Act standards are now taking effect in many states. Three auditors recently questioned staffers at the Maryland Correctional Institution for Women in a practice inspection.
Laura Sullivan NPR

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 8:54 pm

On a recent day at the Maryland Correctional Institution for Women, inmates in jumpsuits peek out of their cells to see three men with clipboards walk into the housing unit. These men are auditors doing a practice inspection. They're here to see if the facility complies with a federal law called the Prison Rape Elimination Act, or PREA.

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Author Interviews
3:16 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

The Rise And Fall Of Stefan Zweig, Who Inspired 'Grand Budapest Hotel'

Stefan Zweig was born to a prosperous Jewish family in Vienna. He wrote novels, short stories and biographies.
Keystone/Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 8:54 pm

In Wes Anderson's latest film, The Grand Budapest Hotel, a writer relates the long and twisting life story of a hotel owner. It's about youthful love and lifelong obsession, and while the story is original, there's a credit at the end that reads: "Inspired by the Writings of Stefan Zweig."

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The Picture Show
3:16 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Scenes And Sorrows: A Portrait Of Weeping Mary

Courtesy of O. Rufus Lovett

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 8:54 pm

Texas is full of memorable town names — Blanket, Stagecoach, Domino and Paint Rock, to list just a few. Each has at least one tale behind it, and All Things Considered host Melissa Block has been telling some of them as part of the series Deep In the Heart Of (A Transforming) Texas.

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Shots - Health News
3:14 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Run When You're 25 For A Sharper Brain When You're 45

Leading an active lifestyle in your 20s will benefit your brain down the road.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 2:47 pm

If you're in your 20s, you might work out because it's fun, or because it makes you look better. But here's another reason to hit the gym or go for a jog — exercising now may help preserve your memory and cognition later in life.

Researchers figured this out by following 2,700 men and women for 25 years as part of the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study.

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