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11:25 am
Mon March 24, 2014

Malaysian Prime Minister Announces Airliner Went Down

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. We have breaking news this morning on the status of the missing Malaysian Airlines Flight 307. Earlier this hour Malaysia's prime minister announced that the government there now believes the plane is lost.

PRIME MINISTER NAJIB RAZAK: It's therefore, with deep sadness and regret, that I must inform you that Flight MH370 ended in the southern Indian Ocean.

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Parallels
11:12 am
Mon March 24, 2014

Which Artwork Is A Metaphor For The Current Global Condition?

President Obama and Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte shake hands in front of Rembrandt's Night Watch after speaking to the press following meetings at the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam on Monday. Which artwork in the museum best captures the current global mood?
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 2:41 pm

President Obama is doing serious work in Europe this week, meeting with the G-7, NATO and the EU to discuss Russia's actions in Ukraine. He's also joining leaders from more than 50 countries in The Hague to talk about keeping nuclear weapons away from terrorists. But before the intense negotiations got underway, he launched this trip with a bit of culture.

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The Two-Way
10:37 am
Mon March 24, 2014

Egyptian Court Sentences More Than 500 Morsi Supporters To Die

Egyptian supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood are seen during their trial in the killing of a police officer last year.
Mohammed Bendari APA Images/Landov

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 11:30 am

An Egyptian court has sentenced to death hundreds of supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi after a mass trial on charges related to an attack that killed a policeman.

The verdicts and sentencing came of the 529 people came after just two sessions of the court, sparking criticism from human rights activists.

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The Two-Way
10:10 am
Mon March 24, 2014

March Madness: After The Upsets, Which Team Do You Like Now?

Kentucky's Andrew Harrison goes up for a shot during his team's victory Sunday over Wichita State. The Wildcats' win sent the previously undefeated Shockers home.
Charlie Riedel AP

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 4:08 pm

  • On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Tom Goldman on the madness so far

Duke went down the first day, losing to nearly unknown Mercer.

Syracuse was bounced out on Saturday by Dayton — a team that hadn't gone very far in 30 years.

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The Salt
10:02 am
Mon March 24, 2014

Gastrodiplomacy: Cooking Up A Tasty Lesson On War And Peace

Here's one way to get students talking about global affairs: Teach it through food.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 3:45 pm

It's often said that the closest interaction many Americans have with other countries' cultures is through food. That kind of culinary diplomacy is particularly common in Washington, D.C., where immigrants from all over the world have cooked up a diverse food scene.

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Culture
8:47 am
Mon March 24, 2014

When Scripture Hits The Screen, Filmmakers Say Their Prayers

Russell Crowe, the lead in Darren Aronofsky's forthcoming biblical epic Noah, may have received a quick blessing from Pope Francis at a recent public audience, but the movie is drawing criticism in some quarters.
Niko Tavernise Paramount Pictures Classics

Originally published on Sat March 22, 2014 10:18 am

The film Noah, with Russell Crowe in the title role, opens in the U.S. March 28. It's already been banned in several Muslim countries for portraying a man considered a prophet, and here in this country it's stirred controversy among some Christians for not being a sufficiently literal telling of the Bible story. NPR's Scott Simon spoke with Rajinder Dudrah, senior lecturer in screen studies at the University of Manchester, on why religious figures in film can cause both fascination and offense.

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Culture
8:47 am
Mon March 24, 2014

Lost Album Gives Voice To A Johnny Cash In Recovery

John Carter Cash relaxes on the cabin's front steps.
Stephen Jerkins

Originally published on Tue March 25, 2014 9:24 am

On the porch of a log cabin outside Nashville lies the junk of country music royalty — an old bowling ball here, a Hotpoint stove from the 1940s there. Part retreat, part recording studio, this is where Johnny Cash spent some of his golden years.

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Author Interviews
8:46 am
Mon March 24, 2014

'Parentology': Bribes, Behavior And The Science Of Raising Kids

Dalton Conley lives in New York City with his wife and two children.
Stephen P. Hudner Courtesy of Simon and Schuster

Originally published on Sun March 23, 2014 10:36 am

Raising kids is hard. It just is. And there's a whole industry out there trying to help parents figure out how to do it. There are all kinds of books on the very basics — sleeping, eating and talking — to those that deal with more complicated stuff, like how to teach self esteem and resiliency.

Adding to that aspirational reading list is Parentology: Everything You Wanted to Know about the Science of Raising Children but Were Too Exhausted to Ask, a new book by sociologist Dalton Conley.

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Music Interviews
8:45 am
Mon March 24, 2014

For Boy George, Music And Style Is Just 'What I Do'

Boy George's first solo album in 19 years is This Is What I Do.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 11:25 am

Boy George's style and sound are unmistakable. In 1982, the Irish Catholic singer joined a Jewish drummer, a Protestant guitar-and-keyboard player and a Jamaican bassist to form Culture Club.

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The Two-Way
8:23 am
Mon March 24, 2014

Japan To Turn Over Nuclear Stockpile To U.S. For Safe Keeping

Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe leaves Tokyo's Haneda airport Sunday en route to a two-day nuclear security summit in The Hague, Netherlands.
Kyodo/Landov

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 10:43 am

Japan has agreed to hand over to the U.S. a decades-old stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium and highly enriched uranium that is said to be large enough to build dozens of nuclear weapons.

The 700-pound cache, which had been maintained by Japan for research purposes, would be turned over to the U.S. for safe keeping, according to an agreement announced Monday at the G7 nuclear security summit in The Hague, Netherlands. It's part of an Obama administration push to prevent the nuclear material from being stolen by potential terrorists.

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