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Environment
4:11 am
Tue February 25, 2014

Colorado Becomes First State To Restrict Methane Emissions

Originally published on Tue February 25, 2014 7:06 am

Methane is a potent greenhouse gas from oil and gas production. The rules require companies to find and repair equipment leaks. The rules also will reduce air pollution that contributes to smog.

Europe
4:11 am
Tue February 25, 2014

Political Crisis Deepens Ukraine's Dire Economic Conditions

Originally published on Tue February 25, 2014 7:06 am

As Ukraine steadies itself, a first order of business is to fix its economy. Renee Montagne talks to Simon Johnson, former chief economist for the IMF, who is now a professor at MIT.

Shots - Health News
2:40 am
Tue February 25, 2014

Doctors' Offices Get Put On Hold Trying to Find Out Who's Insured

Filling out the forms is part of the ritual of going to the doctor. But with the Affordable Care Act, it's more complicated.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed February 26, 2014 1:56 pm

Sheila Lawless manages a small rheumatology practice in Wichita Falls, Texas, about two hours outside Dallas. She makes sure everything in the office runs smoothly — scheduling patients, collecting payments, keeping the lights on. Recently she added another duty — incorporating the trickle of patients with insurance plans purchased on the new Affordable Care Act exchanges.

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Science & Environment
2:38 am
Tue February 25, 2014

A College Project That Imagines A Floating City For Oil Workers

View of central crossing of the central hub island, one of dozens of man-made islands envisioned by Rice University architecture students. The islands would serve as a floating city for oil workers off the coast of Brazil.
Rice School of Architecture

Originally published on Thu February 27, 2014 7:58 am

Imagine you're in a college-level architecture class and your assignment is to come up with an idea so revolutionary that it could be considered an important advance in industrial design.

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Education
2:32 am
Tue February 25, 2014

The Business Of Frats: Shifting Liability For Trauma And Injury

Students walk past the Phi Kappa Theta fraternity house at San Diego State University after news that a student had died there on April 20, 2012.
Sandy Huffaker Getty Images

Originally published on Tue February 25, 2014 2:55 pm

For those of you keeping track of the headlines detailing sexual assault and hazing at frat houses, it may come as no surprise that fraternities have a dark side. Caitlin Flanagan, a writer at The Atlantic, spent a year investigating Greek houses and discovered that "the dark power of fraternities" is not just a power over pledges and partygoers but one held over universities as well.

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Shots - Health News
11:09 pm
Mon February 24, 2014

Deadly MERS Virus Circulates Among Arabian Camels

Jockeys take their camels home after racing in Egypt's El Arish desert. The annual race draws competitors from around the Middle East, including Saudi Arabia, where camels carry the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome virus.
Nasser Nouri Xinhua /Landov

Originally published on Tue February 25, 2014 3:15 pm

Scientists have gotten close to pinning down the origin of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, a dangerous respiratory disease that emerged in Saudi Arabia 17 months ago.

It turns out the MERS virus has been circulating in Arabian camels for more than two decades, scientists report in a study published Tuesday.

So far MERS has sickened more than 180 people, killing at least 77 of them — an alarming 43 percent. But scientists haven't been sure where the virus came from or how people catch it.

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It's All Politics
5:36 pm
Mon February 24, 2014

The Lessons Of John Dingell's Departure

Rep. John Dingell, D-Mich., whose House career stretches nearly 60 years, will retire at the end of his term as the longest-serving member of Congress in history.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 6:23 pm

Nearly every news account Monday of Rep. John Dingell's retirement announcement made mention of his amazing longevity — the Michigan Democrat is the longest-serving member in the history of Congress.

While his durability is the stuff of legend, it's also remarkable that an accomplished, heavyweight legislator like Dingell stayed so long into an era of congressional dysfunction.

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It's All Politics
4:27 pm
Mon February 24, 2014

Study: Conservatives And Liberals Rarely Debate On Twitter

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 2:32 pm

When it comes to political discourse, Twitter chatter splits along liberal and conservative lines that rarely cross, according to a new report.

The Pew Research Center and the Social Media Research Foundation together used software to map and analyze words, hashtags and urls that define Twitter conversation. The results show that when the nature of a conversation on Twitter is political, two distinct and polarized groups tend to form.

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The Two-Way
4:26 pm
Mon February 24, 2014

Pope Announces Overhaul Of Vatican Bureaucracy

Pope Francis arrives to meet Haiti's President Michel Joseph Martelly at the Vatican on Monday.
Claudio Peri AP

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 2:31 pm

Pope Francis on Monday announced a sweeping overhaul – the first in 25 years — of the Vatican's bureaucracy, creating a new economic secretariat,

NPR's Sylvia Poggioli reported on the story for our Newscast unit:

"The department will have broad powers to oversee all the Vatican's economic and administrative affairs. It will be headed by Australian Cardinal George Pell, archbishop of Sydney. Pell will report to a new 15-member economy council made up of eight cardinals from various parts of the world and seven lay experts.

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Around the Nation
4:23 pm
Mon February 24, 2014

Older Americans' Breakups Are Causing A 'Graying' Divorce Trend

The divorce rate for Americans over 50 doubled between 1990 and 2010.
Alexander Abramov iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue February 25, 2014 8:04 am

For baby boomers, divorce has almost become, like marriage, another rite of passage. The post-World War II generation is setting new records for divorce: Americans over 50 are twice as likely to get divorced as people of that age were 20 years ago.

But just because it's more common, doesn't mean it's not still painful.

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