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The Salt
2:33 am
Thu August 29, 2013

Move Over, Pot Stickers: China Cooks Up Hundreds Of Dumplings

A Flock of Dumpling Ducklings: What's inside? Roasted Beijing duck, of course.
Anthony Kuhn NPR

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 6:52 pm

All week, we've been talking about dumplings — from tortellini's sensual origins in Italy to kubbeh's tasty variations in Israel.

But perhaps no country has a longer history or greater variety of dumplings than China. Dumplings come in all shapes and with every imaginable filling. They are served at everything from a humble family meal to elaborate works of culinary art.

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The Salt
2:32 am
Thu August 29, 2013

For Restaurant Workers, A Struggle To Put Food On The Table

Losia Nyankale helps daughter Jonessa and son Juliean learn the alphabet. Nyankale, who works in a restaurant in Washington, D.C., says she needs food stamps and child-care subsidies to make ends meet.
Jennifer Ludden NPR

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 10:27 am

Losia Nyankale, 29, didn't mean to make a career in the restaurant business. But after Nyankale was in college for two years, her mom lost her job as a schoolteacher and could no longer pay tuition. Then, Nyankale's temp jobs in bookkeeping dried up in the recession. So she went back to her standby — restaurant work.

"I did some kitchen work. The pantries or the salad station," she says. "I've also managed, supervised, wash[ed] dishes."

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It's All Politics
2:31 am
Thu August 29, 2013

Yet Another Democrat Takes The Lead In NYC Mayor Race

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 3:45 am

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All Tech Considered
2:30 am
Thu August 29, 2013

To Attract Millennials, Automakers Look To Smartphones

Audi's night vision assistant, an example of how car companies are making cars that are part of drivers' digital lives.
Courtesy of Audi

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 2:47 pm

Part of a series of stories produced in collaboration with Youth Radio on the changing car culture in America.

In an effort to attract young people to cars, automakers have set up shop in Silicon Valley and are looking to the digital world as a way to lure them.

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Around the Nation
2:28 am
Thu August 29, 2013

Area Man Realizes He's Been Reading Fake News For 25 Years

Jan. 18-24, 2001
The Onion

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 12:47 pm

Before Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert became establishments in news satire, there was The Onion. Thursday, "America's Finest News Source" turns 25.

Two college students founded the fake news organization, which began as a newspaper in Madison, Wis. "It really started as something very local that was intended mainly to ... sell pizza coupons," Editor-in-Chief Will Tracy tells Morning Edition host Renee Montagne..

It still has that Midwestern touch, he says.

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The Two-Way
5:50 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

50 Years Later: Sounds And Voices From The March

Margaret Pearson, 71, immigrated from the U.K. two months after the '63 March in Washington. She joined the crowd today.
Tanya Ballard Brown NPR

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 8:35 am

It was a cloudy and rainy day in Washington on Wednesday. But that did not keep thousands from descending on the National Mall to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington.

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The Two-Way
5:26 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

Obama: U.S. Has 'Concluded' Assad Used Chemical Weapons In Syria

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 5:33 pm

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The NPR 100
5:20 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

The Inspiring Force Of 'We Shall Overcome'

American folk singer and activist Pete Seeger (left) adopted and helped popularize "We Shall Overcome" by teaching the song at rallies and protests. Here he sings with activists in Greenwood, Miss., in 1963.
Adger Cowans Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 8:26 pm

As the nation marks the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, All Things Considered concludes its series about the moments that defined the historic summer of 1963. Back in 1999, Noah Adams explored the history and legacy of the song "We Shall Overcome" for the NPR 100. The audio link contains a condensed version of that piece.

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The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
4:41 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

Joining The '63 March, Despite Parents' Racial Biases

All Washington, D.C., liquor stores were closed on Aug. 28, 1963. While Maury Landsman's parents, who owned a liquor store, stayed home that day, he was determined to participate in the march.
Charles Del Vecchio The Washington Post/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 7:41 pm

There would be no last call on the day of the March on Washington, and Manny and Mitzie Landsman had no choice in the matter. Their D.C. shop, Metro Liquors, was closed for business on Aug. 28, 1963, just one of 1,900 businesses ordered by local authorities not to sell, pour or wrap any alcoholic beverage from 12:01 that morning until 2 a.m. the next day.

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The Two-Way
4:17 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

China Weighs Ban On Homework; Teachers, Students Argue Against

In the hopes of easing pressures on China's students, the country' education officials are considering a ban on written homework. Here, students walk to school in Beijing in June.
Ed Jones AFP/Getty Images

Chinese officials hope to rein in teachers who assign too much homework, as the country's Ministry of Education considers new rules that ban schools from requiring students to complete written tasks at home. Citing undue stress on students, the ministry would also limit the number of exams students take.

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