Ashley Westerman

Host and Reporter

Ashley, born in Manila, Philippines, was adopted and raised in Western Kentucky. She is a 2010 University of Kentucky graduate with a B.A. in Journalism and Political Science. She also attended the University of Maryland for graduate studies in Journalism for one year. Ashley interned with Morning Edition at NPR Headquarters in Washington, DC, in 2011 and was hired afterward as a temp production assistant. In March 2012, Ashley started her reporting and hosting career at WRKF. She is also a member of the Center for International Journalists 2013 International Reporting Fellowship Program. In addition to public radio, Ashley also loves UK basketball, her Fantasy Football team, traveling and cats.

Ways to Connect

There are a lot of reasons victims of sexual assault choose not to report it. High on that list is fear of retaliation, so many victims won't come forward unless they can stay anonymous.

The criminal justice system cannot guarantee that kind of confidentiality for accusers and the accused. Further, when sexual assault is reported to law enforcement, a majority of cases never make it to trial. In fact, only 3 percent to 18 percent of sexual assaults lead to a conviction, according to research funded by the Justice Department.

As an Asian-American woman, I've had any number of opportunities to see someone who looked like me on the big and small screen.

Since I was a little girl, I've seen Disney's Mulan, Trini Kwan from Fox Kids' Mighty Morphin Power Rangers and Dr. Cristina Yang on Grey's Anatomy, to name a few. And while the portrayal of Asian-American women by Hollywood and television could use some work — too often they're oversexualized or rendered exotic — at least we're present and have some depth.

Stanley Tretick

As journalist and author Kitty Kelley conducted research for her unauthorized biography of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, she became good friends with photographer Stanley Tretick. He is best known for his coverage of President John F. Kennedy’s 1960 campaign and presidency for Look magazine, and for taking iconic pictures like the one of John Jr. playing under his father’s desk in the Oval Office.

Daughts of Charity Serivces

After Charity Hospital in New Orleans closed in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, community clinics filled the gap in care for the poor and uninsured.

LSU Press

In his new book, “Segregated Soldiers: Military Training at Historically Black Colleges in the Jim Crow South”, historian Marcus Cox argues that African Americans leveraged military service to claim their civil rights.

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