Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and producer who currently works on The Two Way, NPR's flagship news portal. In the past, he has edited and coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor on the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar during the Iraq war.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for, and editing and producing stories for's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

Chris Henkey, the pilot who's being called a hero for his fast and calm handling of a potentially disastrous situation, is due to retire next week after 42 years in the cockpit.

Houses were washed away and people raced to high ground in central Japan on Thursday after a major river burst through a levee overwhelmed by torrential rains. The Kinugawa River's banks collapsed around midday, flooding a residential neighborhood.

Nearby areas also sustained severe flooding and mudslides; the government has urged 130,000 people to evacuate the area.

Instead of welcoming some 53,000 students to the start of the school year, teachers in Seattle are marching in picket lines Wednesday, going on strike over issues that range from pay to testing.

From member station KUOW, Ann Dornfeld reports for our Newscast unit:

"The district said it was offering the teachers a generous pay raise, but teachers said they deserve more, after waiting through the great recession for higher pay.

In a $725 million deal, the 127-year-old National Geographic magazine is leaving behind its nonprofit status and becoming a key piece of a new venture between its parent organization and 21st Century Fox.

The dramatic shift will place the venerable magazine, with its iconic yellow-rimmed covers, under a new venture called National Geographic Partners. Fox will own 73 percent of the new company, with the National Geographic Society owning 27 percent.

Quiksilver, the clothing company that has sold surfing gear since 1969, is seeking relief from its creditors under Chapter 11 of the U.S. bankruptcy code. The filing is for the company's American division; it comes on the day Quiksilver had been scheduled to discuss its third-quarter financial results.

The maker of sporting apparel and gear postponed that conference call, instead announcing that it had entered into a plan to reduce its debt by more than $500 million.

After a widely watched video showed one of its journalists tripping a man carrying a young boy as they attempted to run past police in Hungary, the TV network N1TV has fired the camerawoman.

Thousands of refugees and other migrants who are streaming into Hungary from Serbia are finding themselves detained near the border, frustrating their attempts to reach Germany.

The president of the European Union is calling on countries to welcome their share of what the U.N. predicts will be at least 850,000 migrants over the next two years.

Andrew Kohut, the founding director of the Pew Research Center, has died at age 73. The former leader of the polling group that calls itself a "fact tank" had been battling a form of leukemia that his son says was first diagnosed in 2009.

Kohut's wife, Diane Colasanto, posted a message online saying he had died early Tuesday morning, "finally at peace."

Kohut had retired from his post as the Pew Research Center's president in 2012.

Two defensive backs from John Jay High School's football team are suspended — and could face criminal charges — after they teamed up to blindside a game official at the end of a football game in central Texas this weekend.

In a sharp revision of Catholic policy, Pope Francis rewrote the process of annulling a marriage within the church on Tuesday, issuing two apostolic letters aimed at speeding and simplifying what has often been a process lasting more than a year.

The Catholic Church still doesn't recognize divorce, but the new changes promise to make it easier to annul marriages that are deemed invalid by a church court, by using a process that is "more agile," the Vatican says.