Dan Gill

Host of Bayou Garden

Dan is an Associate Professor in Consumer Horticulture with the LSU AgCenter. He is the spokesperson for the LSU AgCenter’s "Get It Growing project," an effort encouraging home horticulture throughout Louisiana. Dan is also author of "Month-by-Month Gardening in Louisiana" and co-author of the "Louisiana Gardener’s Guide."

LSU AgCenter

Home vegetable gardening has become increasingly popular over past few years. We often see an increase in vegetable gardening when we have an economic downturn like the one we recently got through

Tomatoes remain the most popular of all the vegetables we grow in our gardens. And this makes a lot of sense seeing how tomatoes form an important part of Louisiana cooking and cuisine.

Vine-ripened, home-grown tomatoes have a quality to them that makes them far better than tomatoes you might find in a supermarket.

Preventing nematodes

Sep 16, 2016
LSU AgCenter

You may sometimes read or hear about planting certain plants around other plants to prevent insect problems. This is called companion planting.

The idea is certain plants will give off aromas that will repel insects. Unfortunately, research doesn't substantiate claims around companion planting.

LSU AgCenter

Few sights are more thrilling in the garden than to see rapidly moving hummingbirds darting among the flowers.

So favored are the jewel-colored birds, feeders are put up to entice them into the landscape. Even better are gardens full of plants to provide the birds gardens full of nectar that they crave.

Creating a garden with plants specifically chosen to attract and feed these birds isn't difficult at all.


LSU AgCenter

In addition to the flooding damage done to our homes, landscapes have also been impacted. Flooding primarily impacts landscape plants by saturating the soil.

Plant roots obtain the oxygen they need from the air spaces in the soil. When these spaces are filled with water for an extended period, the roots are deprived of the oxygen they need and they may drown.


LSU AgCenter

Oppressive heat and humidity are a part of the late summer here in south Louisiana-- as much as good food and music are a part of our local culture. Despite the heat, gardening continues for those who can stand it.

Flower beds may not be looking their best right now. Our long growing season and abundance of insect and disease problems generally makes it unreasonable to expect all bedding plants to hold up from May through October.


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