Dan Gill

Host of Bayou Garden

Dan is an Associate Professor in Consumer Horticulture with the LSU AgCenter. He is the spokesperson for the LSU AgCenter’s "Get It Growing project," an effort encouraging home horticulture throughout Louisiana. Dan is also author of "Month-by-Month Gardening in Louisiana" and co-author of the "Louisiana Gardener’s Guide."

LSU AgCenter

Cool days and chilly nights are just the kind of weather lettuce enjoys. Lettuce is a vegetable that is so easy to grow, and delicious, that any gardener should include it in their vegetable garden.

Lettuce is a cool season crop for us in Louisiana. Our planting season extends from September through March, with the harvest ending around May.

January is a great time to plant seeds directly into the garden or into pots.


LSU AgCenter

The pace of things tends to slow down this time of the year in the garden. Although we may continue to plant, prepare beds, harvest winter vegetables, and enjoy cool season flowers, most gardeners tend to find this time of the year a more relaxed time.

Taking a little time now can save a little time and money when moving into high gear this coming spring.


LSU AgCenter

Citrus growers in Louisiana have produced an excellent crop of sweet, delicious fruit this year. The citrus industry in Louisiana is known for growing some of the finest quality fruit in the nation, and it's readily available from local grocery stores, farmer's markets, and roadside vendors.

LSU AgCenter

Christmas trees are an important part of holiday celebrations for many people. Decide beforehand where you're going to display your tree, so you'll have a good idea about the size you'll need, and whether all of the sides will be suitable for viewing. A tree going into a corner, for instance, will only need three good sides.

Look for a tree that is clean, healthy, well-shaped, and has a straight-trunk near the bottom. It should have a strong fragrance, pliable needles, and good color. Be sure to shake the tree; avoid trees that drop a large number of needles when shaken.


LSU AgCenter

If you've ever visited a nursery in the spring on the weekend, you're bound to see a parking lot full of cars, and a nursery full of shoppers.

Spring remains the prime season when gardeners head to the nursery to purchase trees, shrubs, ground covers, and vines. If something is going to be planted in the yard, most of the time, gardeners focus on spring to do it.'

But spring is really not the best time to plant great hearty plants, like trees and shrubs, hearty ground covers, and vines. Now, as we head into the fall season, is really the best time.


LSU AgCenter

Herbs can be loosely grouped into cool season annuals, warm season annuals, and perennials.

Annuals live for one season and then dial. Perennial herbs, on the other hand, can live for many years.

Fall is a great time to plant cool season annual herbs and most of the perennial herbs into your garden.


Halloween in the Garden

Oct 31, 2015
LSU AgCenter

The Halloween season has put me in the mind to look at scary traditions, and relate them to some common gardening ideas and misconceptions.

So here goes Halloween in the Garden...


LSU AgCenter

Now is the perfect time to plant cool season bedding plants that will brighten our flower gardens and landscapes for the next five or six months-- well into the next spring.

Gardeners often overlook the fact that some of these cool season bedding plants are wonderfully fragrant. Color always seems to be the dominant factor in selecting these plants.


LSU AgCenter

As the weather cools down, it's a joy to get out into the garden on the weekends. There's often a lot of catchup to do after the long hot, summer.

As well as this is the prime planting season for cool season vegetables, bedding plants, and hearty trees, shrubs, and ground covers.


LSU AgCenter

As the days shorten and temperatures begin cooler, it's apparent that summer is finally ending. Lawn care definitely begins to change this time of the year. The growth of popular turf grasses, like Saint Augustine, Centipede Bermuda and Zoysia, begin to slow down this time of year. You should still mow your fall grasses to maintain a proper height.


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