Frank Barnett

Morning Edition Host

Frank is a native Houstonian. He relocated to Baton Rouge to attend LSU where he earned a communications degree. After working in the film industry for three years as a production assistant, he decided to make the switch to radio and could not be happier with his decision.

After getting his start at WRKF as an intern in 2013, Frank is now a member of the WRKF news team, and hosts Morning Edition.

He enjoys reading (especially Stephen King and Ray Bradbury), fishing, and of course, watching movies.

Microwaving Saturn

Feb 1, 2016
http://www.playbuzz.com/tomnixon10/can-you-recognize-a-planet-by-its-picture

For most people, a microwave means a quick way to "nuke" your food.

But for LSU Math Professor Dr. Robert Lipton, a microwave means another thing: “Deep space communications – like how do you control the Mars Rover? They can use microwaves or radiowaves.”

Lizards!

Jan 25, 2016
Alexey Sergeev - http://www.asergeev.com/pictures/k/Anole.htm

Spring, summer and fall, they’re everywhere – green lizards. From backyards to office buildings, swamps to downtown streets, these lizards (or Green Anoles) are found everywhere in Baton Rouge; and, there are lots of them.

Charlie Riedel, AP

President Barack Obama speaking Thursday at a Town Hall meeting at McKinley Senior High School in Baton Rouge, LA.

To rewatch video of the President's Town Hall meeting, click the link below.

Flood Fight

Jan 11, 2016
Frank Barnett

The Mississippi River is still rising and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers are in what they call a Flood Fight.

During Flood Fight the most important thing to the Corps is monitoring and attending to the well-being of the levees. All measures are taken to ensure its safety and well-being.


WRKF, Travis Lux

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers opened the Bonnet Carre Spillway on Sunday. Heavy rain in the Mississippi Valley and rising river water stages prompted the opening.

The spillway was opened to divert water into Lake Pontchartrain to help keep the volume of Mississippi River flows at New Orleans from exceeding 1.25 million cubic feet per second. That amount of water is enough to fill the entire Mercedes-Benz Superdome in a minute and 40 seconds.

The spillway may be open for several weeks. All public access areas within the spillway are closed until further notice.

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