Jesse Hardman

As the new Coastal Reporter, Jesse Hardman will draw on 15 years of worldwide experience in radio, video and print journalism. As a radio reporter he has reported for NPR, BBC, and CBC, and for such familiar programs as MarketplaceThis American LifeLatino USA, and Living on Earth. He served as a daily news reporter and news magazine producer for WBEZ in Chicago. He has worked extensively in Asia, Africa and Latin America, and has reported on New Orleans for Time. At WWNO Jesse has been the creator and producer of The Listening Post, the station’s civic engagement project. He holds degrees from Kenyon College, Ohio, and Harvard University, Massachusetts.

Jesse Hardman

Back in August, just after the historic floods, Louisiana officials expressed concern that proposed federal and state disaster recovery funds might not be enough. With deadlines for flood assistance programs passed, or looming, affected residents are learning the math of getting back on their feet.

Making a home in Southeastern Louisiana has always meant risk of flooding. While some families in low lying coastal parishes elevated their homes in the 1990s, Hurricanes Katrina and Rita kicked off a boom of raising homes. Now, more than 150 elevation companies operate in Orleans Parish alone, and have spent the past decade competing for billions of dollars in federal subsidies to help local homeowners elevate. Elevating a home, as much as 18 feet, can mean lower flood insurance rates, and...

Billy Nungesser was the President of Plaquemines Parish five years ago when the BP oil disaster happened. Nungesser’s constituency of around 23,000 residents were some of the hardest hit along the Gulf Coast. For months after the disaster,Nungesser was a constant presence on national television, taking on both industry and government officials over their handling of the spill and cleanup. Billy Nungesser sat down with WWNO coastal reporter Jesse Hardman at Lil Gs diner in Belle Chasse to...

Five years ago an off-shore explosion killed 11 workers and created a massive 210 million gallon spill in the Gulf of Mexico. There have been questions ever since about how the accident could have been prevented and how to improve off-shore safety standards. How safety standards in off-shore oil have changed since the BP disaster. Carl Moore started working on off-shore supply boats back in the 1980s . "When I started it was 'don't put your hand there,' and it was told by somebody that had...

What happens when you combine the most popular sport in the U.S. with one of the most dire environmental situations in the country? The catchy analogy that a football field sized piece of Louisiana coastal wetlands is lost every half-hour. The legacy of the coastal wetlands marketing of a football field every half hour 110 million people tuned in to the 2014 Super Bowl. Sandwiched between $4 million commercials from Budweiser, Chrysler and Doritos was something a little less expected, but...

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