Jesse Hardman

As the new Coastal Reporter, Jesse Hardman will draw on 15 years of worldwide experience in radio, video and print journalism. As a radio reporter he has reported for NPR, BBC, and CBC, and for such familiar programs as MarketplaceThis American LifeLatino USA, and Living on Earth. He served as a daily news reporter and news magazine producer for WBEZ in Chicago. He has worked extensively in Asia, Africa and Latin America, and has reported on New Orleans for Time. At WWNO Jesse has been the creator and producer of The Listening Post, the station’s civic engagement project. He holds degrees from Kenyon College, Ohio, and Harvard University, Massachusetts.

Science and Environment
9:55 am
Sat August 30, 2014

Vanishing Points In Terrebonne Parish Part Deaux

Chauvin Sculpture Garden.

Originally published on Thu November 6, 2014 3:31 pm

The best way to understand Louisiana’s rapidly changing coastal map may be to look from above. That’s how you see the small highways headed south, slim like bony fingers, disappearing into a blue backdrop. What a map can’t express are the histories, hopes and desires of communities along the bayous of the Gulf Coast.

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Science and Environment
6:37 pm
Tue August 26, 2014

River Diversions And The Fate Of Louisiana's Coast

The Wax Lake Delta, created by a diversion of the Atchafalaya River.

Originally published on Thu November 6, 2014 3:28 pm

A big part of Louisiana’s coastal Master Plan centers around something called “diversions.” Fresh water from the Mississippi River is diverted so that the water, and the silt it carries, can rebuild the sinking coast. But this technique, a centerpiece of Louisiana's coastal Master Plan, is contentious.

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Science and Environment
9:13 am
Sat August 23, 2014

Vanishing Points In Terrebonne Parish

Provost Cemetery in Dulac, Louisiana.

Originally published on Thu November 6, 2014 3:29 pm

The best way to understand Louisiana’s rapidly changing coastal map may be to look from above. That’s how you see the small highways headed South, slim like bony fingers, disappearing into a blue backdrop. What a map can’t express are the histories, hopes and desires of communities along the bayous of the Gulf Coast.

Read more
Law and Order
7:43 pm
Tue August 5, 2014

More Than 1,000 Undocumented Migrant Youth Harbored In Louisiana Homes Awaiting Trial

Originally published on Tue August 5, 2014 8:52 pm

A new investigation from the Lens looks at the case of thousands of unaccompanied minors from Central American countries who are facing court proceedings in New Orleans. 

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Science and Environment
4:32 pm
Fri August 1, 2014

Local Photographer Captures Changing Louisiana Coast From A New Perspective

Marsh Degradation

Originally published on Thu November 6, 2014 3:36 pm

New Orleans native and local fine arts photographer Michel Varisco developed a curiosity about the Gulf Coast region at a young age. With a mother who is a former biochemist, and engineer dad, she started learning on family road trips. Her dad would explain the Bonnet Carré Spillway, or point out dead trees while driving down LA1 to Grande Isle. 

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Science and Environment
6:49 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Coastal Restoration Drives An Industry Boom

LeBlanc Marine offloads concrete artificial oyster reef materials in a St. Bernard Parish marsh.

Originally published on Thu November 6, 2014 4:00 pm

This spring a state committee approved $477 million for coastal protection and restoration. When you throw in federal dollars, and private funding as well, fixing Louisiana's coast is becoming big business.

Here are some of the people who stand to benefit.

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