Lee Rouse

Host

Lee Rouse is the LSU AgCenter's East Baton Rouge Parish horticulture agent. Lee worked as a horticulture agent in New Orleans before moving back to his hometown of Baton Rouge.

While working for the AgCenter, Lee has conducted Master Gardener Training classes and has graduated more than 100 people through his program. He has played an integral role in the development of the annual Farm to Table conference in New Orleans, while aiding the expansion of urban farming and community gardening in South Louisiana.

Lee is a contributor to the Advocate, WRKF, and maintains the East Baton Rouge Parish Master Gardener Facebook page. He is an alumnus of the LSU College of Agriculture.

LSU AgCenter

The cooler weather we've been hoping for is finally here, and the forecast indicates it's here to stay.

This season's welcoming temperatures encourage specific lawn diseases and weeds. Large patch is a prevalent lawn disease this time of year. Large patch loves cooler nights and warmer days. Optimum conditions for this disease involve temperatures between 65 and 75 degrees at night and temperatures not above 85 to 96 degrees in the day.


LSU AgCenter

Perennial verbenas can provide a long season of color to your flower garden. Verbenas are low-growing plants with showy clusters of flowers in a variety of colors.

The best time of the year to plant the trailing verbena are October through November and February through March. These plants establish best in mild temperatures.


Dan Gill / LSU AgCenter

Medium to large shade trees provide benefits when you put them in your yard. These benefits inclue air purification, the removal of CO2 and other greenhouse gases from the air, and a moderation of the micro-climate in your yard and in your home.

Shade trees will keep home cooler in summer by blocking the heat of the sun and will keep home warmer in winter by blocking heat-sapping winds. But there's more.


Dan Gill / LSU AgCenter

One could argue October to be the most critical month for lawn maintenance. Work you put in now may not show immediate results, but that work will create a healthier lawn in the spring and summer to come.

This is the time of year summer weeds begin to finish up for the season. Simultaneously, winter weeds are beginning to emerge.


LSU AgCenter

Virginia buttonweed is one of the worst summer weeds infesting Louisiana turf grasses.

Predictions indicated this weed would become a worse-than-average problem this summer, thanks to the summer flooding last year. And the prediction was absolutely correct.


LSU AgCenter

The Supertunia Vista Bubblegum Petunia is one of Louisiana's most durable petunia varieties and this year it's been designated an LSU AgCenter's superplant.

One of the most talked-about petunias in landscape gardening in recent years, the Supertunia Vista Bubblegum Petunia has been one of the best petunias in the landscape trials at LSU AgCenter's Hammond Research Station.


LSU AgCenter

Though September is often still hot, gardeners are beginning to anticipate cooler weather. It's now we start to focus on planting cool season vegetables that will grow and produce during the fall, winter, and spring. September is a transitional month, with cool season vegetables going into the ground as warm season vegetables are remain in the garden.


Gardening for birds

Sep 2, 2017
LSU AgCenter/Dan Gill

When you're gardening to attract wildlife like, birds, butterflies, and other insects, you need to think about what considerations might attract these creatures to your landscape.

To attract birds, you want to provide the precise type of water, food, and cover that will make them feel at home in your garden.


LSU AgCenter

When it comes to annual transplants, the month of September gives us a planting break. We're in a period during which it's too hot plant cool season annuals and won't be hot long enough to plant summer annuals.

The weather is much too humid and oppresive for cool season annuals to live for any period of time right now. Planting them now will yield you a plant that will hang on for a few weeks and essentially melt.


LSU AgCenter

You may have noticed webs being formed around the tips of the branches of pecan and sweet gum trees. You may have also noticed defoliation under the webbing on these trees.

This most likely indicates infestation of the fall webworm. In the south, the fall webworm uses deciduous hardwood trees and some evergreen trees as a host.


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