Lee Rouse

Host

Lee Rouse is the LSU AgCenter's East Baton Rouge Parish horticulture agent. Lee worked as a horticulture agent in New Orleans before moving back to his hometown of Baton Rouge.

While working for the AgCenter, Lee has conducted Master Gardener Training classes and has graduated more than 100 people through his program. He has played an integral role in the development of the annual Farm to Table conference in New Orleans, while aiding the expansion of urban farming and community gardening in South Louisiana.

Lee is a contributor to the Advocate, WRKF, and maintains the East Baton Rouge Parish Master Gardener Facebook page. He is an alumnus of the LSU College of Agriculture.

Sweet Bay Magnolia
Jenny Evans

The month of June is always a reminder of that Louis Armstrong song, where he sings, "Do yo know what it means to miss New Orleans." That's the song where the lyrics go on to say he dreams of magnolias in bloom and wishes he were there.


LSU AgCenter

What do okra, chocolate, hibiscus, and cotton all have in common?

Give up? These are all in the same botanical family: the Malvaceae family.

Okra is one of the easiest and most heat tolerant vegetable crops you can grow in the south. It's a staple of the home garden. When other vegetables start to peter out in the heat of summer, that's the time okra will stand tall in the garden.


This is a picture of tea... for humans. This is not compost tea.
LSU AgCenter

The needs of our plants are similar to ours. They need to water to survive. But they need minerals to thrive. While humans might drink some iced tea for a bit of that sustenance, pouring iced tea on plants may not to much good.

But there is a "tea" of sorts for plants.


LSU AgCenter

It's not quite summer yet, but the days are becoming longer and hotter. Heat can be unpleasant for people and for plants. That's sepcially the case when they don't have enough to drink.

The hotter it gets, the faster the water either evaporates from the soil or is consumed and then lost by the plant. Landscapers should make sure gardens receive about one inch of water per week. That means there needs to be at least an inch of rain, an inch of irrigated water, or a combination every week.


These are green beans.
LSU AgCenter

Homeowners and renters alike are becoming more interested in growing their own vegetables these days. There are a number of good reasons to look into it.

Some want to grow their own produce to provide a freher, healthier product than they can get from the store. Others feel it's important to exercise self-sufficiency in the production of food. Others go into vegetable gardening for the economics of it and find it most cost effective to grow food rather than than buying from a grocery store.


LSU AgCenter

Go down the pesticide aisle at your local nursery. There are so many different herbicides to choose from. There's a difference between the different types of herbicides. But herbicides are just one of the ways to manage weeds.

Mowing your lawn at the right height is actually a very effective management technique against weeds. If you mow your grass at the right height, you'll need much less herbicide to manage weeds.


LSU AgCenter

It's important to always use the right tool for the right job. Herbicides can be considered a tool in our garden. As gardeners it's important to understand the groupings of herbicides in the garden.

Pre-emergent herbicides take effect on the plant before it emerges, usually before the seed has a chance to germinate. Corn gluten is an organic pre-emergent herbicide.


Itea Virginica, Henry's Garnet
LSU AgCenter

Gardeners have become more environmentally concious over the past few decades. They're employing more environmentally sound principles in the landscape, such as using less pesticide, composting more, and even instlaling rain gardens.


LSU AgCenter

Edible landscaping has really taken off in the next few years. When we say edible landscaping, we're talking about the idea of incorporating plant material that's edible into a given landscape instead of growing edible foods only in a food-growing agricultural area.

The rabbit eye blueberry is an excellent addition to the landscape. It provides food as well as esthetic qualities. It's also a part of the LSU AgCenter Superplant Program. The program highlights tough and beautiful plants that perform well in Louisiana landscapes.


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