Sue Lincoln

Reporter

Sue Lincoln is a veteran reporter in the political arena. Her radio experience began in the early ’80s, in “the other L-A” — Los Angeles.

Since her transplantation to Louisiana 25 years ago, she has covered the state, the capital, and its colorful cast of characters for Louisiana Radio Network, LPB and the Southern Education Desk.

Now she’s focusing her experience and expertise on producing WRKF’s Capitol Access.

Ways to Connect

courtesy: USDOJ

“You may disagree with who Alton Sterling was as a person, but look at his children. There’s five children that have to be taken care of for the rest of their life – five!” attorney Chris Stewart said, after filing a wrongful death suit on behalf of Sterling's children.


allianceswla.org

Whether it’s refundable tax credits, a decade's worth of property tax forgiveness, or cash up front, Louisiana is making deals with industry. In fact, state Economic Development Secretary Don Pierson has a new video out about it.


npr.org

The latest state employment figures are out, and the song remains the same one we’ve heard before from legislative fiscal analyst Greg Albrecht.

“We’ve been in a real decline, while the rest of the country has not. What we really need is job growth.”

Louisiana’s 5.7% unemployment rate, compared to the national average of 4.3%, is impacting sales tax and personal income tax collections, which together make up 61% of total state revenue.

npr.org

Cindy has left Louisiana, but not without leaving some flooded roadways behind. DOTD Secretary Shawn Wilson says anyone travelling today would be wise to check 511la.org first.


Sue Lincoln

Heading to the Governor’s Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness (GOHSEP) for the latest on Tropical Storm Cindy, I felt my shoulders tightening up, and caught myself thinking, “Oh no, not again!”

But what about those who are still rebuilding from last year’s floods? Is Louisiana prepared to help with the emotional and psychological stress of this event?


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When will lawmakers be called back for the next special session to deal with the fiscal cliff?

“You know, that’s a good question,” Governor John Bel Edwards said, when asked. “And I truly don’t know.”


Sue Lincoln

“I move the House of Representatives adjourn sine die,” the “dean” of the House Andy Anders intoned Friday evening, receiving cheers in response.

The second special session of the year delivered a budget only marginally different than the one proposed by the Senate during the regular session. That had many – including Governor John Bel Edwards – wondering aloud whether the special session had truly been necessary.

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“This is essentially the same bill that we passed out a couple of weeks ago, that we thought was responsible and made complete sense,” Senate Finance chair Eric LaFleur told his committee. “It just took a little, a week I think, for the House to come around. And I don’t foresee it getting any better than it is now.”


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A somber mood dominated the Capitol Wednesday, following the early morning news that Louisiana Congressman Steve Scalise had been shot.


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“The more we fund this year, the bigger the fiscal cliff is going to be next year. And we can’t sustain more taxes. It’s irresponsible!”

Representative Valarie Hodges (R-Denham Springs) summed up the thinking of a majority of House Appropriations committee members, as special session budget hearings began where the regular session left off – with a bill that doesn’t spend all the estimated revenue.


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