Sue Lincoln

Reporter

Sue Lincoln is a veteran reporter in the political arena. Her radio experience began in the early ’80s, in “the other L-A” — Los Angeles.

Since her transplantation to Louisiana 25 years ago, she has covered the state, the capital, and its colorful cast of characters for Louisiana Radio Network, LPB and the Southern Education Desk.

Now she’s focusing her experience and expertise on producing WRKF’s Capitol Access.

Ways to Connect

Sue Lincoln

  Governor John Bel Edwards tried to put a good face on it.

“I am extremely pleased with where we are, considering where we started. And while we may have come up short in a few ways, we made difficult choices and we made tremendous progress,” the Governor said, during a press conference a few minutes after the session’s close.

Yet when lawmakers adjourned the 2nd special session, they were still $350-million short of what was needed for the budget that begins July first, and the chasm between the House and Senate had widened.

“At this point, we do not have the luxury of amending this bill,” Senate Revenue and Fiscal Affairs chairman J.P. Morrell told the Senate, so on this final day of the special session, House Bill 50 was considered without an expected amendment that could have raised another $88-million.

“House Bill 50 simply changes the way the capital gains tax is able to be refunded,” Jennings Senator Blade Morris explained.

Last Day, Last Chance

Jun 23, 2016

This is the final day of the second special session, and it must end by midnight tonight.

“We’re going to ask you to come in for 9 a.m.; be prepared to stay the day,” Senate President John Alario warned the upper chamber last evening. “More than likely we’ll be in and out with some long recesses in between.”


Explaining The Thinking

Jun 21, 2016

Despite everything we’ve heard from the Edwards’ administration about the depth of Louisiana’s budget shortages, it’s quite clear now: the House leadership is done considering any more revenue-raising measures.

“We raised a couple hundred million dollars, so there’s enough money to put towards TOPS; there’s also enough money to put toward the private-public partnerships for the hospitals. So it’s not all gloom and doom.”

Squabbling Over Crumbs

Jun 21, 2016
S. Lincoln

After the House approved cuts freeing up another $70-million for the upcoming budget Monday, they then squabbled over where to spend it – on TOPS, or on health care.

Prairieville Rep. Tony Bacala argued to put the money toward TOPS.

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