Sue Lincoln

Reporter

Sue Lincoln is a veteran reporter in the political arena. Her radio experience began in the early ’80s, in “the other L-A” — Los Angeles.

Since her transplantation to Louisiana 25 years ago, she has covered the state, the capital, and its colorful cast of characters for Louisiana Radio Network, LPB and the Southern Education Desk.

Now she’s focusing her experience and expertise on producing WRKF’s Capitol Access.

Ways to Connect

Sue Lincoln

With chants of “What do we want? Justice! When do we want it? Now!”  and “Black Lives Matter!”, protest marches and rallies in the wake of the Alton Sterling shooting continued in Louisiana’s capital city Sunday.

“Right now we are hurt, enraged, and beyond ready for a change. We need to take these strong feelings and turn it into motivation,” one teen-aged speaker at a rally on the Capitol steps said, earning cheers and applause from the crowd of several thousand.

When hurricanes or tornadoes hit, FEMA, the Salvation Army, and others step in to help. When a fire destroys a family home, the local Red Cross chapter often provides assistance. But who helps families devastated by shootings, like Alton Sterling’s?


courtesy: Facebook

  For Baton Rouge patrol officers Blane Salamoni and Howie Lake II, it started with a call from dispatch.

“Have a suspicious code two. He pulled a gun on complainant and told him he couldn’t be around there,” the dispatcher advises.

Minutes later, it ended for 37-year-old Alton Sterling, with five shots fired, and witnesses screaming,“Oh, my God!”

“They shot him?”

“Yes!”

What happened in between? Baton Rouge Police Chief Carl Dabadie says we still don’t know.

Women's Place, Part 1

Jul 6, 2016

(The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in the case of Roe v. Wade in 1973, yet until the 1974 Constitution, women in Louisiana were legal “chattel”, i.e., property of their fathers or husbands. This is the first of a two-part series looking at “a woman’s place” in Louisiana, more than 40 years later.)

A new lawsuit, filed in federal court July first, is challenging the constitutionality of all seven abortion restrictions passed by the Louisiana Legislature this spring.

How did lawmakers do during the sessions this year? It depends on who you ask. The latest scorecard, LSU Student Government’s “Higher Education Report Card,” awarded 34-percent of Louisiana lawmakers A’s, while 26-percent earned F’s .

LSU SGA President Zack Faircloth says the idea came out of something System President F. King Alexander said about fairness.

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