Sue Lincoln

Reporter

Sue Lincoln is a veteran reporter in the political arena. Her radio experience began in the early ’80s, in “the other L-A” — Los Angeles.

Since her transplantation to Louisiana 25 years ago, she has covered the state, the capital, and its colorful cast of characters for Louisiana Radio Network, LPB and the Southern Education Desk.

Now she’s focusing her experience and expertise on producing WRKF’s Capitol Access.

Ways to Connect

npr.org

Harvey makes his second landfall this morning in Louisiana.

“Then it will basically track diagonally across Louisiana from southwest Louisiana up through the northeast corner,” Governor John Bel Edwards says.


LA Dept. of Economic Development

“Everyone in local government says, ‘Let me take care of myself,’ because we took away their tax base -- and it has been going on for years,” Robert Adley, the governor’s representative to the Board of Commerce and Industry, says. “That’s what this is really about.”

“This” is the Industrial Tax Exemption Program, also known as ITEP. 


Sue Lincoln

The best guesstimates of science show Hurricane Harvey headed toward Texas, but just in case…

“I have signed a statewide emergency declaration in preparation for Hurricane Harvey and its impacts on Louisiana,” Governor John Bel Edwards announced Thursday afternoon.


Watching Harvey

Aug 23, 2017
LSU Earth Scan Lab

We’re watching Harvey.  No, not the 1950 movie starring Jimmy Stewart, or even the LSU tiger re-christened Mike VII on Monday. This Harvey is the tropical system that fell apart in the Caribbean this past weekend and is now regenerating in the Gulf of Mexico.


Sue Lincoln

“I think that if an eclipse is a time for change and a time for action, we’re in that place now,” said Maxine Crump, as the solar eclipse dimmed and darkened skies across a broad swath of the United States. The director of the Dialog on Race program addressed the Baton Rouge Press Club ten days after the events in Charlottesville, Virginia, had many examining the apparent eclipse of the nation’s soul.


Sue Lincoln

It’s “Voter Registration Week” in Louisiana, and Secretary of State Tom Schedler is urging everyone possible to participate.

“You can go online and do that in about 3 minutes,” Schedler says, by logging onto sos.la.gov. “It’s not that difficult.”


wikimedia commons

Now that we’ve established that many state lawmakers suffer from fiscal myopia, are they doing any envisioning – however fuzzy the view – toward Louisiana’s future? Representative Steve Carter, a Baton Rouge Republican, says it’s not the first time he’s been asked that question.


Louisiana Oil&Gas Association

Perhaps lawmakers avoid getting their fiscal myopia checked because they’re waiting for a bonus to pay for the eye exam -- like New Iberia Representative Blake Miguez, who is expecting the oil and gas industry to boom again.


LA DOTD

“I want to say a few words to those who actively worked in opposition to raising the gas tax – ever: this nonsense has hurt the state,” Baton Rouge Representative Steve Carter said when withdrawing his gasoline tax bill from consideration this past spring, effectively calling some of his fellow lawmakers shortsighted.

The tax revenue would have helped with the $13-billion backlog of deferred highway and bridge maintenance.


California Coastal Commission

“I see a deficit of just over $1.5-billion, correct? That's the fiscal cliff we keep talking about?” New Orleans Representative Gary Carter asked, as the latest tally of next July's fall off in state revenue was presented to the Joint Budget Committee last week.

Yet despite all the warning signs, some lawmakers don't see the drop as being all that steep.


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