Sue Lincoln

Reporter

Sue Lincoln is a veteran reporter in the political arena. Her radio experience began in the early ’80s, in “the other L-A” — Los Angeles.

Since her transplantation to Louisiana 25 years ago, she has covered the state, the capital, and its colorful cast of characters for Louisiana Radio Network, LPB and the Southern Education Desk.

Now she’s focusing her experience and expertise on producing WRKF’s Capitol Access.

Ways to Connect

courtesy: Louisiana Wildlife Federation

Recent partisan criticism of the time it’s taken for the governor’s office to get a flood recovery plan in place has been duly noted, and is being answered today.


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Louisiana's budget problems extend beyond the current year shortfalls, but as the topic continues to dominate policy discussions ast the capitol, we're going to delve into some of the history and allied components of Louisiana's fiscal mess. Basically they all boil down to one thing – more money needing to go out than is coming in. When it comes to state retirement systems, that problem has a name: it's called the “UAL”.


courtesy Mark Carroll

What will be the 2017 focus at Louisiana’s capitol?

“The state budget is so bad that you can’t allow yourself to be distracted by anything else,” Senate Revenue and Fiscal Affairs chairman J.P. Morrell says.


Taxing On-Line Sales

Jan 2, 2017
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If you’ve done some online shopping since the calendar flipped to 2017, you may have noticed your total at checkout was higher than expected.

“If you live in Louisiana, the next time you go to Amazon and buy something, you can just add 10% to your bill,” state Treasurer and U.S. Senator-elect John Kennedy grumbles.

npr.org

All week we’ve been looking into Louisiana’s environmental quality, so what about the air that we breathe?

“Certain standards go above and beyond what EPA calls for. We’re moving in that direction,” DEQ Secretary Chuck Carr Brown told us.


Sue Lincoln

Louisiana has no comprehensive water policy, though DEQ Secretary Chuck Carr Brown believes it should.

“From a water use standpoint, I think there should be some overall plan that everybody contributes to,” Brown says.

But getting there? That’s the problem, as a bill debate during last spring’s legislative session pointed out.

LDEQ

The Department of Environmental Quality does attempt to educate law enforcement officials about environmental crimes.  Capitol Access’ Wallis Watkins recently attended one of their seminars.


courtesy: LA DEQ

For years, it’s been joked that D.E.Q. stands for “don’t even question”, since Louisiana allows its industrial plants to self-report hazardous releases.

“There’s some entities, if they have a release, they’ll say, ‘Well, nothing left the fence line’,” Dr. Chuck Carr Brown acknowledges.

Of course, that was before he became Secretary of Louisiana’s Department of Environmental Quality earlier this year.


Recovery School District

It would seem logical: don’t build schools on dump sites.

“We have no law in Louisiana. Other states have it. This simply protects our children when someone proposes to build a school on a piece of land that is formerly used to dump stuff.”


Singing the Year Away

Dec 23, 2016
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2016 was the year that kept on giving -- giving all of us in Louisiana some real grief. Yet rather than bring you down with the usual “year in review”, here’s a way to laugh -- about my singing, at least. So, with apologies to the composer of “12 Days of Christmas”, here it is:


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