Sue Lincoln


Sue Lincoln is a veteran reporter in the political arena. Her radio experience began in the early ’80s, in “the other L-A” — Los Angeles.

Since her transplantation to Louisiana 25 years ago, she has covered the state, the capital, and its colorful cast of characters for Louisiana Radio Network, LPB and the Southern Education Desk.

Now she’s focusing her experience and expertise on producing WRKF’s Capitol Access.

Ways to Connect

S. Lincoln

As we’ve been examining the issues and the candidates’ stances in the governor’s race, we’ve made more than a few comparisons to the Huey Long era of Louisiana’s history. Many of the issues in the current governor’s race may be the same as in Huey Long’s day, but there’s one huge difference this year: the money involved.

“He’s got zillions of dollars. He’ll continue to have zillions of dollars. He leans on people from his position as a senator. He’s been able to raise a lot of money in his Super PAC, and a lot of money individually.”

Jay Dardenne is talking about David Vitter. With one month to go to the election, Dardenne’s campaign finance report showed $1.6-million in the bank. Vitter had $7-miilion on hand; $4-million in his campaign fund and $3-million in his Super PAC.

As we look ahead to deciding on the next governor of Louisiana, we’ve been also looking back, taking a cue from Huey Long, known for the “Share our Wealth” plan under the motto, “Every Man a King”.

Jan Moller with the Louisiana Budget Project points out that every issue that plagues the state – and the reason we end up on the bottom of so many “good” lists – can be traced back to Louisiana’s ranking as the third poorest state in the nation.

Sometimes it seems like the Jindal administration has been all about wooing business and industry, and then keeping them happy. What do those hoping to succeed Jindal plan to do in the way of economic development?

“My administration will focus on job creation and economic development,” Scott Angelle says. “We have made great progress in that area, but I think we need to do more.”

David Vitter also says it will be an important goal, if he’s elected governor.

“I would continue that focus on economic growth and job creation, but shift it a little bit: not focused any more on incentives, but focused on capacity building.”

We’re far past the days when Huey Long won the governorship by promising free school textbooks for every child. Now it’s all about education reform. Where do today’s candidates stand?

“We label a lot of things in Louisiana ‘reform’, that don’t really offer or deliver much improvement,” says Democrat John Bel Edwards, who opposed the 2012 state education reforms, including school choice. The Republicans all support school choice.


Louisiana’s backlog of unfunded road and bridge projects sits at between $12-billion and $14-billion. How do the candidates for governor propose to catch up, and pay for new roadwork needs?

“Make it a priority in the Capital Outlay Budget, so that we’re going to provide particular projects in Capital Outlay a much higher percentage than we have right now to go to the backlog and the problem of preventive maintenance and road repair,” Jay Dardenne says.